Document Detail


Neurophysiologic assessment of brain maturation after an 8-week trial of skin-to-skin contact on preterm infants.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  19766056     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: Skin-to-skin contact (SSC) promotes physiological stability and interaction between parents and infants. Analyses of EEG-sleep studies can compare functional brain maturation between SSC and non-SSC cohorts.
METHODS: Sixteen EEG-sleep studies were performed on eight preterm infants who received 8 weeks of SSC, and compared with two non-SSC cohorts at term (N=126), a preterm group corrected to term age and a full-term group. Seven linear and two complexity measures were compared (Mann-Whitney U test comparisons p<.05).
RESULTS: Fewer REMs, more quiet sleep, increased respiratory regularity, longer cycles, and less spectral beta were noted for SSC preterm infants compared with both control cohorts. Fewer REMs, greater arousals and more quiet sleep were noted for SSC infants compared with the non-SSC preterms at term. Three right hemispheric regions had greater complexity in the SSC group. Discriminant analysis showed that the SSC cohort was closer to the non-SSC full-term cohort.
CONCLUSIONS: Skin-to-skin contact accelerates brain maturation in healthy preterm infants compared with two groups without SSC.
SIGNIFICANCE: Combined use of linear and complexity analysis strategies offer complementary information regarding altered neuronal functions after developmental care interventions. Such analyses may be helpful to assess other neuroprotection strategies.
Authors:
Mark S Scher; Susan Ludington-Hoe; Farhad Kaffashi; Mark W Johnson; Diane Holditch-Davis; Kenneth A Loparo
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural     Date:  2009-09-17
Journal Detail:
Title:  Clinical neurophysiology : official journal of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology     Volume:  120     ISSN:  1872-8952     ISO Abbreviation:  Clin Neurophysiol     Publication Date:  2009 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2009-10-26     Completed Date:  2009-11-17     Revised Date:  2014-09-20    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  100883319     Medline TA:  Clin Neurophysiol     Country:  Netherlands    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1812-8     Citation Subset:  IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Brain / growth & development*,  physiology*
Electroencephalography
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature / physiology*
Male
Pilot Projects
Skin / innervation
Sleep / physiology
Touch / physiology*
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
NR04926/NR/NINR NIH HHS; NR08587/NR/NINR NIH HHS; NS26793/NS/NINDS NIH HHS; R01 NR004926-04/NR/NINR NIH HHS; R01 NS034508/NS/NINDS NIH HHS; R01 NS034508-05/NS/NINDS NIH HHS; R03 NR008587-01/NR/NINR NIH HHS; R03 NR008587-02/NR/NINR NIH HHS
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