Document Detail


Neurodevelopmental outcome of extremely low birth weight infants with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus requiring shunt insertion.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  18390958     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate neurodevelopmental and growth outcomes among extremely low birth weight infants who had severe intraventricular hemorrhage that required shunt insertion compared with infants without shunt insertion.
METHODS: Infants who were born in 1993-2002 with birth weights of 401 to 1000 g were enrolled in a very low birth weight registry at medical centers that participate in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network, and returned for follow-up at 18 to 22 months' corrected age were studied. Eighty-two percent of survivors completed follow-up, and 6161 children were classified into 5 groups: group 1, no intraventricular hemorrhage/no shunt (n = 5163); group 2, intraventricular hemorrhage grade 3/no shunt (n = 459); group 3, intraventricular hemorrhage grade 3/shunt (n = 103); group 4, intraventricular hemorrhage grade 4/no shunt (n = 311); and group 5, intraventricular hemorrhage grade 4/shunt (n = 125). Group comparisons were evaluated with chi(2) and Wilcoxon tests, and regression models were used to compare outcomes after adjustment for covariates.
RESULTS: Children with severe intraventricular hemorrhage and shunts had significantly lower scores on the Bayley Scales of Infant Development IIR compared with children with no intraventricular hemorrhage and with children with intraventricular hemorrhage of the same grade and no shunt. Infants with shunts were at increased risk for cerebral palsy and head circumference at the <10th percentile at 18 months' adjusted age. Greatest differences were observed between children with shunts and those with no intraventricular hemorrhage on these outcomes.
CONCLUSIONS: This large cohort study suggests that extremely low birth weight children with severe intraventricular hemorrhage that requires shunt insertion are at greatest risk for adverse neurodevelopmental and growth outcomes at 18 to 22 months compared with children with and without severe intraventricular hemorrhage and with no shunt. Long-term follow-up is needed to determine whether adverse outcomes persist or improve over time.
Authors:
Ira Adams-Chapman; Nellie I Hansen; Barbara J Stoll; Rose Higgins;
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural     Date:  2008-04-07
Journal Detail:
Title:  Pediatrics     Volume:  121     ISSN:  1098-4275     ISO Abbreviation:  Pediatrics     Publication Date:  2008 May 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2008-05-02     Completed Date:  2008-06-04     Revised Date:  2013-06-05    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0376422     Medline TA:  Pediatrics     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  e1167-77     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics/Division of Neonatology, Emory University School of Medicine, 46 Jesse Hill Jr Drive SE, Atlanta, GA 30303, USA. ira_adams-chapman@oz.ped.emory.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Cerebral Hemorrhage / complications*
Cerebral Ventricles
Cerebrospinal Fluid Shunts*
Child Development*
Developmental Disabilities / etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Growth
Humans
Hydrocephalus / complications,  therapy*
Infant
Infant, Extremely Low Birth Weight*
Infant, Newborn
Male
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
M01 RR1032/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; M01 RR16587/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; M01 RR2172/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; M01 RR2635/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; M01 RR30/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; M01 RR39/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; M01 RR44/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; M01 RR6022/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; M01 RR633/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; M01 RR70/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; M01 RR7122/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; M01 RR750/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; M01 RR80/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; M01 RR8084/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; M01 RR997/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; U01 HD36790/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD027851-19/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD21364/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD21373/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD21385/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD21397/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD27851/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD27853/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD27856/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD27871/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD27880/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD27881/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD27904/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD34167/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD34216/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD40461/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD40492/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD40498/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD40521/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD40689/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; UL1 RR24139/RR/NCRR NIH HHS
Investigator
Investigator/Affiliation:
Alan Jobe / ; William Oh / ; Betty R Vohr / ; Angelita Hensman / ; Lucy Noel / ; Avroy A Fanaroff / ; Michele C Walsh / ; Deanne Wilson-Costello / ; Nancy S Newman / ; Bonnie S Siner / ; Ronald N Goldberg / ; Ricki Goldstein / ; Kathy Auten / ; Melody Lohmeyer / ; Barbara J Stoll / ; Ira Adams-Chapman / ; Ellen Hale / ; Ann R Stark / ; Kimberly Gronsman Lee / ; Kerri Fournier / ; Colleen Driscoll / ; Brenda B Poindexter / ; Anna M Dusick / ; Diana D Appel / ; Dianne Herron / ; Lucy Miller / ; Leslie Dawn Wilson / ; Leslie Richard / ; Linda L Wright / ; Elizabeth M McClure / ; W Kenneth Poole / ; Betty Hastings / ; David K Stevenson / ; Susan R Hintz / ; Barry E Fleisher / ; Joan M Baran / ; M Bethany Ball / ; Waldemar A Carlo / ; Namasivayam Ambalavanan / ; Myriam Peralta-Carcelen / ; Monica V Collins / ; Shirley S Cosby / ; Vivien Phillips / ; Neil N Finer / ; David Kaegi / ; Yvonne E Vaucher / ; Maynard R Rasmussen / ; Kathy Arnell / ; Clarence Demetrio / ; Martha G Fuller / ; Chris Henderson / ; Edward F Donovan / ; Jean Steichen / ; Barb Alexander / ; Cathy Grisby / ; Marcia Mersmann / ; Holly Mincey / ; Jody Shively / ; Teresa L Gratton / ; Charles R Bauer / ; Shahnaz Duara / ; Ruth Everett / ; Lu-Ann Papile / ; Conra Backstrom Lacy / ; Dale L Phelps / ; Gary Myers / ; Linda Reubens / ; Diane Hust / ; Gina Rowan / ; Sheldon B Korones / ; Henrietta S Bada / ; Tina Hudson / ; Kim Yolton / ; Marilyn Williams / ; Abbot R Laptook / ; Walid A Salhab / ; R Sue Broyles / ; Gay Hensley / ; Jackie F Hickman / ; Susie Madison / ; Nancy A Miller / ; Jon E Tyson / ; Brenda H Morris / ; Pamela J Bradt / ; Esther G Akpa / ; Patty A Cluff / ; Claudia Y Franco / ; Anna E Lis / ; Georgia McDavid / ; T Michael O'Shea / ; Robert Dillard / ; Nancy Peters / ; Barbara Jackson / ; Seetha Shankaran / ; Yvette Johnson / ; Rebecca Bara / ; Debbie Kennedy / ; Geraldine Muran / ; Richard A Ehrenkranz / ; Linda Mayes / ; Patricia Gettner / ; Monica Konstantino / ; Elaine Romano /
Comments/Corrections

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