Document Detail


Neuroconnectivity and Valproic Acid: The Myelin Hypothesis.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22652270     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Neuropsychiatric medications that directly alter the epigenome, such as valproic acid, can under certain conditions reactivate critical developmental periods and thus impact adult neuroconnectivity. In animal models valproic acid was shown to inhibit the process of postnatal myelination and to replicate age-dependent decline in remyelination efficiency. The human central nervous system's myelination process, unlike that of non-human primates commonly used in the experimental models, is an intricate heterochronous process that continues well into adult life and which probably underlies later life neurocognitive changes and plasticity. Chronic exposure to valproic acid, especially in patients with epilepsy and neuropsychiatric disorders, may profoundly affect this process and its developmental trajectory. Further studies using novel MRI methods that allow in vivo mapping of myelination trajectories across the lifespan are urgently required to address the potential effects of valproic acid on brain development.
Authors:
Ivana Rosenzweig; Zoran Vukadinovic; Anthony J Turner; Marco Catani
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2012-5-28
Journal Detail:
Title:  Neuroscience and biobehavioral reviews     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1873-7528     ISO Abbreviation:  -     Publication Date:  2012 May 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-6-1     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7806090     Medline TA:  Neurosci Biobehav Rev     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
Affiliation:
Academic Unit of Sleep and Department of Psychiatry, Royal Brompton Hospital, London, UK.
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