Document Detail


Neural correlates of being imitated: an EEG study in preverbal infants.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22646701     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
A foundational aspect of early social-emotional development is the ability to detect and respond to the actions of others who are coordinating their behavior with that of the self. Behavioral work in this area has found that infants show particular preferences for adults who are imitating them rather than adults who are carrying out noncontingent or mismatching actions. Here, we explore the neural processes related to this tendency of infants to prefer others who act like the self. Electroencephalographic (EEG) signals were recorded from 14-month-old infants while they were observing actions that either matched or mismatched the action the infant had just executed. Desynchronization of the EEG mu rhythm was greater when infants observed an action that matched their own most recently executed action. This effect was strongest immediately prior to the culmination of the goal of the observed action, which is consistent with recent ideas about the predictive nature of brain responses during action observation.
Authors:
Joni N Saby; Peter J Marshall; Andrew N Meltzoff
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.     Date:  2012-05-30
Journal Detail:
Title:  Social neuroscience     Volume:  7     ISSN:  1747-0927     ISO Abbreviation:  Soc Neurosci     Publication Date:  2012  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-09-11     Completed Date:  2013-04-10     Revised Date:  2013-11-06    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101279009     Medline TA:  Soc Neurosci     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  650-61     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122 , USA. joni.saby@temple.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Brain / physiology*
Electroencephalography
Female
Humans
Imitative Behavior / physiology*
Infant
Male
Psychomotor Performance / physiology
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
HD-68734/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; R21 HD068734/HD/NICHD NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections

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