Document Detail


Neonatal nephrotic syndrome associated with placental transmission of proinflammatory cytokines.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21113627     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Although there are clinical data suggesting a direct relationship between neonatal nephrotic syndrome and placental transfer of proinflammatory cytokines from mothers with HELLP syndrome, there is no direct evidence that these inflammatory cytokines are pathogenic. Here, the first human model of placental transfer of proinflammatory cytokines from a mother with HELLP syndrome to a newborn, resulting in neonatal nephrotic syndrome is described. Forty-eight hours after delivery, the neonate developed nephrotic syndrome and abnormalities in renal function which resolved completely during the 5 days following the initiation of therapy with hydrocortisone, albumin, and furosemide. The newborn's cord blood showed increased concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha that were identical to those found in the mother's serum. Hydrocortisone therapy was discontinued after a 2-week course. Clinical and laboratory improvements were associated with a marked decline in serum cytokine levels, indicating that the proinflammatory cytokines were pathogenic. The neonate remained in remission with no recurrence of nephrotic syndrome during 12 months of follow-up. These findings demonstrate that the placental transmission of circulating cytokines causing HELLP syndrome occurred during pregnancy and may have resulted in nephrotic syndrome in the neonate.
Authors:
Farahnak Assadi
Related Documents :
6432117 - Deposition of eosinophil cationic protein in granulomas in allergic granulomatosis and ...
10544847 - Sweet's syndrome in a patient with acute crohn's colitis and longstanding ankylosing sp...
24724137 - Non-syndromic multiple odontogenic keratocyst: a case report.
19379647 - Atypical histopathology in bowel-associated dermatosis-arthritis syndrome: a case report.
3293247 - Surgical approach in severe cases of maxillonasal dysplasia (binder's syndrome).
23017087 - Genes, language, and the nature of scientific explanations: the case of williams syndrome.
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2010-11-27
Journal Detail:
Title:  Pediatric nephrology (Berlin, Germany)     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1432-198X     ISO Abbreviation:  Pediatr. Nephrol.     Publication Date:  2010 Nov 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-11-29     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8708728     Medline TA:  Pediatr Nephrol     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
Section of Nephrology, Department of Pediatrics, Rush University Medical Center, 1725 West Harrison Street, Suite 718 Professional Bldg, Chicago, IL, USA, fassadi@rush.edu.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Individual heterogeneity in mortality mediates long-term persistence of a seasonal microparasite.
Next Document:  Cystic diseases of the kidney: ciliary dysfunction and cystogenic mechanisms.