Document Detail


Neonatal mortality and length of newborn hospital stay.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  8692623     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of hospital discharge time on neonatal mortality of term newborns. DESIGN: Infants who were discharged home at 5 days of age of younger and who subsequently died were compared with control infants using a retrospective case-control design. Descriptive information was collected from records of infants who were not discharged home from the hospital of birth (because of death or transfer to a tertiary care hospital) to determine the age at which their illnesses presented. METHODS: We reviewed death certificates for all infants with birth weights of 2500 g or greater born at 37 weeks' gestational age or greater who died in the first 28 days of life and who were born in one of four Utah counties (1985 through 1989). Of the 109,256 eligible births, 115 infants were found who had died in the neonatal period. Eighty-four infants had not been discharged home from the hospital of birth, 5 infants had had hospital stays of more than 5 days, 9 records could not be located, 17 presumed healthy infants were discharged from the hospital at 5 days of age or younger. These 17 infants were each matched with 3 control infants. Newborn nursery charts were reviewed to determine hospital discharge times for case and control infants. Descriptive information regarding the time of presentation of illness was collected for the other 89 infants. RESULTS: The mean age of hospital discharge was 43 +/- 21 hours for the 17 case infants and 47 +/- 25 hours for the 51 control infants. The odds ratio for neonatal mortality for discharge at less than 24 hours was 1.65 (95% confidence interval, 0.42 to 3.34) and for discharge at less than 48 hours was 1.16 (95% confidence interval, 0.4 to 3.34). Of the 84 infants who were not discharged home from the hospital of birth, 93% had been symptomatic by 12 hours of age, and 99% were symptomatic by 18 hours. CONCLUSIONS: Most full-term infants who die in the neonatal period are symptomatic within the first 18 hours after birth. We could not demonstrate an association between early hospital discharge and neonatal mortality in those infants who died after discharge home.
Authors:
S A Beebe; J R Britton; H L Britton; P Fan; B Jepson
Related Documents :
18662233 - Quality of care of vlbw neonates: relationship between unit volume and outcome is diffe...
16549213 - Place of birth and variations in management of late preterm ("near-term") infants.
8065293 - Down syndrome prevalence at birth--united states, 1983-1990.
Publication Detail:
Type:  Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Pediatrics     Volume:  98     ISSN:  0031-4005     ISO Abbreviation:  Pediatrics     Publication Date:  1996 Aug 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1996-08-29     Completed Date:  1996-08-29     Revised Date:  2010-03-24    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0376422     Medline TA:  Pediatrics     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  231-5     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City 84132, USA.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Age of Onset
Case-Control Studies
Cause of Death
Death Certificates
Female
Humans
Infant Mortality*
Infant, Newborn
Length of Stay / statistics & numerical data*
Male
Odds Ratio
Patient Discharge / statistics & numerical data*
Retrospective Studies
Risk Factors
Sudden Infant Death / epidemiology
Time Factors

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Parental availability for the care of sick children.
Next Document:  Maternal risks for very low birth weight infant mortality.