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Neonatal bronchial hyperresponsiveness precedes acute severe viral bronchiolitis in infants.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22713595     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: Respiratory syncytial virus and other respiratory tract viruses lead to common colds in most infants, whereas a minority develop acute severe bronchiolitis often requiring hospitalization. We hypothesized that such an excessive response to respiratory tract viral infection is caused by host factors reflected in pre-existing increased bronchial responsiveness. OBJECTIVE: We sought to compare bronchial responsiveness and lung function in 1-month-old neonates who later develop acute severe bronchiolitis with those who do not. METHODS: We measured infant lung function (n = 402) and bronchial responsiveness to methacholine (n = 363) using the raised-volume rapid thoracoabdominal compression technique before any respiratory symptoms in 1-month-old neonates from the Copenhagen Prospective Study of Asthma in Childhood birth cohort born to mothers with asthma. The children were prospectively monitored for respiratory symptoms and given a diagnosis of acute severe bronchiolitis according to a fixed algorithm. RESULTS: Thirty-four (8.5%) infants had acute severe bronchiolitis before 2 years of age, 21 (62%) were hospitalized, and 23 (67%) of the cases were associated with respiratory syncytial virus. Children who later had acute severe bronchiolitis irrespective of viral species had a 2.5-fold increased responsiveness to methacholine (provocative dose of methacholine producing a 15% decrease in transcutaneous oxygen pressure [PD(15)]) at age 1 month compared with control subjects (median PD(15) in cases vs control subjects, 0.13 vs 0.33 μmol; P = .01), whereas differences in baseline airflow were not significant for forced expiratory volume at 0.5 seconds (mean z score for cases vs control subjects, -0.18 vs -0.01; P = .36) and forced expiratory flow at 50% of forced vital capacity (mean z score for cases vs control subjects, -0.37 vs -0.09; P = .13). CONCLUSION: Bronchial hyperresponsiveness in at-risk neonates precedes acute severe bronchiolitis in response to infections with respiratory tract virus.
Authors:
Bo L K Chawes; Porntiva Poorisrisak; Sebastian L Johnston; Hans Bisgaard
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Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2012-6-17
Journal Detail:
Title:  The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1097-6825     ISO Abbreviation:  -     Publication Date:  2012 Jun 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-6-20     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  1275002     Medline TA:  J Allergy Clin Immunol     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.
Affiliation:
Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood, Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen and Danish Pediatric Asthma Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital, Gentofte, Copenhagen, Denmark.
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