Document Detail


Negative-pressure wound dressings to secure split-thickness skin grafts in the perineum.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22958590     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Several researches have shown that negative-pressure wound dressings can secure split-thickness skin grafts and improve graft survival. However, in anatomically difficult body regions such as the perineum it is questionable whether these dressings have similar beneficial effects. In this study, we evaluated the effects of negative-pressure wound dressings on split-thickness skin grafts in the perineum by comparing wound healing rate and complication rate with that of tie-over dressings. A retrospective chart review was performed for the patients who underwent a split-thickness skin graft to reconstruct perineal skin defects between January 2007 and December 2011. After grafting, the surgeon selected patients to receive either a negative-pressure dressing or a tie-over dressing. In both groups, the initial dressing was left unchanged for 5 days, then changed to conventional wet gauze dressing. Graft success was assessed 2 weeks after surgery by a single clinician. A total of 26 patients were included in this study. The mean age was 56·6 years and the mean wound size was 273·1 cm(2) . Among them 14 received negative-pressure dressings and 12 received tie-over dressings. Negative-pressure dressing group had higher graft taken rate (P = 0·036) and took shorter time to complete healing (P = 0·01) than tie-over dressing group. The patients with negative-pressure dressings had a higher rate of graft success and shorter time to complete healing, which has statistical significance. Negative-pressure wound dressing can be a good option for effective management of skin grafts in the perineum.
Authors:
Kyeong-Tae Lee; Jai-Kyong Pyon; So-Young Lim; Goo-Hyun Mun; Kap Sung Oh; Sa-Ik Bang
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2012-9-7
Journal Detail:
Title:  International wound journal     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1742-481X     ISO Abbreviation:  Int Wound J     Publication Date:  2012 Sep 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-9-10     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101230907     Medline TA:  Int Wound J     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Copyright Information:
© 2012 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and Medicalhelplines.com Inc.
Affiliation:
K-T Lee, MD, Department of Plastic Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Ilwon-dong 50, Kangnam-ku, Seoul 135-710, Korea J-K Pyon, MD, Department of Plastic Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Ilwon-dong 50, Kangnam-ku, Seoul 135-710, Korea S-Y Lim, MD, Department of Plastic Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Ilwon-dong 50, Kangnam-ku, Seoul 135-710, Korea G-H Mun, MD, Department of Plastic Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Ilwon-dong 50, Kangnam-ku, Seoul 135-710, Korea KS Oh, MD, Department of Plastic Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Ilwon-dong 50, Kangnam-ku, Seoul 135-710, Korea S-I Bang, MD, Department of Plastic Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Ilwon-dong 50, Kangnam-ku, Seoul 135-710, Korea.
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