Document Detail


Natural mentors, racial identity, and educational attainment among african american adolescents: exploring pathways to success.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22537308     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The present study explored how relationships with natural mentors may contribute to African American adolescents' long-term educational attainment by influencing adolescents' racial identity and academic beliefs. This study included 541 academically at-risk African American adolescents transitioning into adulthood. The mean age of participants at Time 1 was 17.8 (SD = .64) and slightly over half (54%) of study participants were female. Results of the current study indicated that relationships with natural mentors promoted more positive long-term educational attainment among participants through increased private regard (a dimension of racial identity) and stronger beliefs in the importance of doing well in school for future success. Implications of these findings and directions for future research are discussed.
Authors:
Noelle M Hurd; Bernadette Sánchez; Marc A Zimmerman; Cleopatra H Caldwell
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural     Date:  2012-04-26
Journal Detail:
Title:  Child development     Volume:  83     ISSN:  1467-8624     ISO Abbreviation:  Child Dev     Publication Date:    2012 Jul-Aug
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-07-18     Completed Date:  2012-10-24     Revised Date:  2013-07-03    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0372725     Medline TA:  Child Dev     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1196-212     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
© 2012 The Authors. Child Development © 2012 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.
Affiliation:
Center for the Study of Black Youth in Context, University of Michigan, 610 E. University Ave., Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. nhurd@umich.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Achievement*
Adolescent
African Americans / psychology*
Attitude*
Educational Status
Family
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mentors / psychology*
Self Concept*
Social Identification
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
DA07484/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; R01 DA007484/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; R01 DA007484-05A2/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; R01 DA007484-05A2S1/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; R01 DA007484-06/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; R01 DA007484-07/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; R01 DA007484-07S1/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; R01 DA007484-08/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; R01 DA007484-08S1/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; R01 DA007484-08S2/DA/NIDA NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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