Document Detail


NO-Xplode: a case of supplement-associated ischemic colitis.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20358712     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The most common cause of ischemic colitis (IC) is a sudden and transient reduction in splanchnic perfusion. In the younger population, medications are an increasingly recognized cause of ischemic bowel disease. Over-the-counter supplements may also lead to the development of ischemic colitis through similar effects. We present a case of ischemic colitis in a 42-year-old active duty service member after using the performance-enhancing supplement, NO-Xplode. In this report, we review the pharmacology of this supplement and its proposed mechanism of injury.
Authors:
Charles D Magee; Fouad J Moawad; Frank Moses
Publication Detail:
Type:  Case Reports; Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Military medicine     Volume:  175     ISSN:  0026-4075     ISO Abbreviation:  Mil Med     Publication Date:  2010 Mar 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-04-02     Completed Date:  2010-06-08     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  2984771R     Medline TA:  Mil Med     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  202-5     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, 6900 Georgia Avenue, Washington, DC 20307, USA.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Administration, Oral
Adult
Colitis, Ischemic / chemically induced*,  diagnosis
Colonoscopy
Diagnosis, Differential
Dietary Supplements / adverse effects*
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Military Personnel
Nonprescription Drugs / administration & dosage,  adverse effects*
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Nonprescription Drugs

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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