Document Detail


Music Therapy Research in the NICU: An Updated Meta-Analysis.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22908052     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Data-Review    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Purpose: To provide an overview of developmental and medical benefits of music therapy for preterm infants.Design: Meta-analysis.Sample: Empirical music studies with preterm infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).Main Outcome: Evidence-based NICU music therapy (NICU -MT ) was highly beneficial with an overall large significant effect size (Cohen's d = 0.82). Effects because of music were consistently in a positive direction.Results: Results of the current analysis replicated findings of a prior meta-analysis and included extended use of music.1 Benefits were greatest for live music therapy (MT ) and for use early in the infant's NICU stay (birth weight <1,000 g, birth postmenstrual age <28 weeks). Results justify strong consideration for the inclusion of the following evidence-based NICU -MT protocols in best practice standards for NICU treatment of preterm infants: music listening for pacification, music reinforcement of sucking, and music pacification as the basis for multilayered, multimodal stimulation.
Authors:
Jayne Standley
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Neonatal network : NN     Volume:  31     ISSN:  1539-2880     ISO Abbreviation:  Neonatal Netw     Publication Date:  2012 Sep 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-08-21     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8503921     Medline TA:  Neonatal Netw     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  311-6     Citation Subset:  N    
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Heart for bonding: a new protocol of care for hypoplastic left heart syndrome.
Next Document:  The pluses and minuses of bariatric surgery for morbid obesity: An endocrinological perspective.