Document Detail


Muscle protein synthesis response to exercise training in obese, older men and women.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22246218     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
INTRODUCTION: Physical activity and eating are two major physiological muscle growth stimuli. Although muscle protein turnover rates are not different in young and middle-aged men and women, we recently found that the basal rate of muscle protein synthesis is greater and the anabolic response to mixed-meal intake is blunted in 65- to 80-yr-old women compared with men of the same age. Whether older women are also resistant to the anabolic effect of exercise is not known.
METHODS: We measured the rate of muscle protein synthesis (both during basal, postabsorptive conditions and during mixed-meal intake) before and after 3 months of exercise training in obese, 65- to 80-yr-old men and women.
RESULTS: At the beginning of the study (before training) the basal, postabsorptive muscle protein fractional synthesis rate (FSR) was significantly greater in women than in men (0.064 ± 0.006%·h(-1) vs 0.039 ± 0.006%·h(-1), respectively, P < 0.01), whereas the meal-induced increase in the muscle protein FSR was greater in men than in women (P < 0.05). In men, exercise training approximately doubled the basal muscle protein FSR (P = 0.001) but had no effect on the meal-induced increase in muscle protein FSR (P = 0.78). In women, exercise training increased the muscle protein FSR by ~40% (P = 0.03) and also had no effect on the meal-induced increase in muscle protein FSR (P = 0.51).
CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that there is significant sexual dimorphism not only in the basal, postabsorptive rate of muscle protein synthesis but also in the anabolic response to feeding and exercise training in obese, older adults.
Authors:
Gordon I Smith; Dennis T Villareal; David R Sinacore; Krupa Shah; Bettina Mittendorfer
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Medicine and science in sports and exercise     Volume:  44     ISSN:  1530-0315     ISO Abbreviation:  Med Sci Sports Exerc     Publication Date:  2012 Jul 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-06-18     Completed Date:  2012-11-20     Revised Date:  2014-09-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8005433     Medline TA:  Med Sci Sports Exerc     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1259-66     Citation Subset:  IM; S    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Basal Metabolism / physiology
Body Composition
Energy Intake / physiology
Exercise / physiology*
Female
Humans
Male
Muscle Proteins / biosynthesis*
Muscle, Skeletal / metabolism*
Obesity / metabolism*
Sex Factors
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
AG 21164/AG/NIA NIH HHS; AG 25501/AG/NIA NIH HHS; AR 49869/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS; DK 56341/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; P30 DK056341/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; P30 DK056341-12/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; R01 AG025501/AG/NIA NIH HHS; R01 AG025501-05/AG/NIA NIH HHS; R01 AG031176/AG/NIA NIH HHS; R01 AG031176-01A2/AG/NIA NIH HHS; R01 AR049869/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS; R01 AR049869-05/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS; RR 00954/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; UL1 RR024992/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; UL1 RR024992/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; UL1 RR024992-03/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; UL1 TR000041/TR/NCATS NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Muscle Proteins
Comments/Corrections

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