Document Detail


Multifetal pregnancy reduction.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  11128411     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Multifetal pregnancies have increased dramatically since the introduction and improvement in assisted reproductive techniques. Multifetal pregnancy reduction (MPR) is a technique developed over the past 15 years to deal with the sequelae of higher order multiple gestations resulting from infertility treatment. With increasing operator experience, loss rates for patients undergoing MPR have declined dramatically. The present review addresses recent data on the outcomes of patients undergoing MPR, as well as recent information on the natural history of higher-order multiple gestations in individuals not undergoing MPR. New developments in this area such as the use of chorionic villus sampling before MPR, as well as MPR to a single fetus, and information on the psychological follow-up of MPR patients are also discussed.
Authors:
J Stone; K Eddleman
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Review    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Current opinion in obstetrics & gynecology     Volume:  12     ISSN:  1040-872X     ISO Abbreviation:  Curr. Opin. Obstet. Gynecol.     Publication Date:  2000 Dec 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2000-12-20     Completed Date:  2001-03-15     Revised Date:  2005-11-16    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9007264     Medline TA:  Curr Opin Obstet Gynecol     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  491-6     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
The Mount Sinai Medical Center, Department of Obstetric and Gynaecology, New York, NY 10029, USA. joanne.stone@mssm.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Female
Humans
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome
Pregnancy Reduction, Multifetal*
Pregnancy, Multiple
Prenatal Diagnosis

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