Document Detail


Moxonidine in the treatment of overweight and obese patients with the metabolic syndrome: a postmarketing surveillance study.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  15269705     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Moxonidine is a centrally active imidazoline receptor agonist that effectively lowers blood pressure and has been shown to have beneficial effects on lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. We assessed the efficacy of moxonidine in a postmarketing surveillance study (CAMUS) conducted in 772 practices in Germany, documenting 4005 patients with hypertension, who were overweight and/or suffered from metabolic syndrome. Patients were treated with moxonidine (Cynt) for the first time following the baseline visit for 8 weeks. Mean blood pressure decreased from 168/97 to 141/83 mmHg for all patients and from 168/96 to 141/83 mmHg for patients with metabolic syndrome. Blood pressure reduction was particularly pronounced in patients with severe hypertension at baseline. The response rate (DBP< or =90 mmHg or reduction > or =10 mmHg) of antihypertensive treatment with moxonidine was 94.0% for all patients and 93.8% for patients with metabolic syndrome. The recommended targets for antihypertensive treatment of the German Diabetes Society/German Hypertension Society were reached by 30.5% of nondiabetics (goal: <140/90 mmHg) and by 3.6% of diabetics (goal: <130/80 mmHg) observed. After 8 weeks of treatment, patients achieved a mean weight loss of 1.4 kg, which was particularly pronounced in obese patients. The rate of patients receiving antihypertensive combination therapy was 81.1% for those with metabolic syndrome, and 63.3% for all other patients. Patients with metabolic syndrome were preferentially treated with ACE inhibitors and diuretics. We conclude that moxonidine effectively reduces blood pressure in patients with metabolic syndrome while simultaneously reducing body weight in obese patients.
Authors:
A M Sharma; T Wagner; P Marsalek
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of human hypertension     Volume:  18     ISSN:  0950-9240     ISO Abbreviation:  J Hum Hypertens     Publication Date:  2004 Sep 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2004-08-23     Completed Date:  2006-07-07     Revised Date:  2006-11-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8811625     Medline TA:  J Hum Hypertens     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  669-75     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antihypertensive Agents / adverse effects,  therapeutic use*
Biological Markers / blood
Blood Glucose / metabolism
Blood Pressure / drug effects
Body Mass Index
Body Weight
Cholesterol, HDL / blood
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Germany / epidemiology
Heart Rate / drug effects
Humans
Hypertension / blood,  drug therapy*,  epidemiology
Imidazoles / adverse effects,  therapeutic use*
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X / blood,  drug therapy*,  epidemiology
Middle Aged
Obesity / blood,  drug therapy*,  epidemiology
Overweight
Prevalence
Product Surveillance, Postmarketing
Risk Factors
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
Triglycerides / blood
Waist-Hip Ratio
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Antihypertensive Agents; 0/Biological Markers; 0/Blood Glucose; 0/Cholesterol, HDL; 0/Imidazoles; 0/Triglycerides; 75438-57-2/moxonidine

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