Document Detail


Movement systems as dynamical systems: the functional role of variability and its implications for sports medicine.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  12688825     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
In recent years, concepts and tools from dynamical systems theory have been successfully applied to the study of movement systems, contradicting traditional views of variability as noise or error. From this perspective, it is apparent that variability in movement systems is omnipresent and unavoidable due to the distinct constraints that shape each individual's behaviour. In this position paper, it is argued that trial-to-trial movement variations within individuals and performance differences observed between individuals may be best interpreted as attempts to exploit the variability that is inherent within and between biological systems. That is, variability in movement systems helps individuals adapt to the unique constraints (personal, task and environmental) impinging on them across different timescales. We examine the implications of these ideas for sports medicine, by: (i) focusing on intra-individual variability in postural control to exemplify within-individual real-time adaptations to changing informational constraints in the performance environment; and (ii) interpreting recent evidence on the role of the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene as a genetic (developmental) constraint on individual differences in physical performance. The implementation of a dynamical systems theoretical interpretation of variability in movement systems signals a need to re-evaluate the ubiquitous influence of the traditional 'medical model' in interpreting motor behaviour and performance constrained by disease or injury to the movement system. Accordingly, there is a need to develop new tools for providing individualised plots of motor behaviour and performance as a function of key constraints. Coordination profiling is proposed as one such alternative approach for interpreting the variability and stability demonstrated by individuals as they attempt to construct functional, goal-directed patterns of motor behaviour during each unique performance. Finally, the relative contribution of genes and training to between-individual performance variation is highlighted, with the conclusion that dynamical systems theory provides an appropriate multidisciplinary theoretical framework to explain their interaction in supporting physical performance.
Authors:
Keith Davids; Paul Glazier; Duarte Araújo; Roger Bartlett
Related Documents :
22004665 - Diagnostic accuracy of endobronchial ultrasound guided transbronchial needle aspiration...
23574215 - Pre-selective screening for matrix elements in linear-scaling exact exchange calculations.
22067225 - Correlates of male fitness in captive zebra finches--a comparison of methods to disenta...
18938195 - Stimulus-response paradigm for characterizing the loss of resilience in homeostatic reg...
10765425 - Statistical evaluation of population data for calculation of radioactive material trans...
21944895 - Interactions of pregabalin with gabapentin, levetiracetam, tiagabine and vigabatrin in ...
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Review    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Sports medicine (Auckland, N.Z.)     Volume:  33     ISSN:  0112-1642     ISO Abbreviation:  Sports Med     Publication Date:  2003  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2003-04-11     Completed Date:  2003-08-04     Revised Date:  2005-11-16    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8412297     Medline TA:  Sports Med     Country:  New Zealand    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  245-60     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
School of Physical Education, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. kdavids@pooka.otago.ac.nz
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adaptation, Physiological
Exercise / physiology*
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Movement / physiology*
Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A / genetics
Posture / physiology
Sports / physiology*
Task Performance and Analysis*
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
EC 3.4.15.1/Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  An effective one-pot synthesis of 5-substituted tetronic acids.
Next Document:  Adhesion molecules, catecholamines and leucocyte redistribution during and following exercise.