Document Detail


Motivational interviewing + feedback intervention to reduce alcohol-exposed pregnancy risk among college binge drinkers: determinants and patterns of response.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21318412     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Many college women are at risk for pregnancy, and binge drinking college women are often at risk for alcohol-exposed pregnancy. Brief interventions with sustainable outcomes are needed, particularly for college women who are binge drinking, at risk for pregnancy, and at increased risk of alcohol-exposed pregnancy. Two-hundred-twenty-eight women at a Mid-Atlantic urban university at risk for alcohol-exposed pregnancy enrolled in the randomized clinical trial, and 207 completed the 4 month follow-up. The BALANCE intervention used Motivational Interviewing plus feedback to target drinking and contraception behaviors. Main outcome measures included (1) the rate of risk for alcohol-exposed pregnancy, (2) the rate of risk drinking, and (3) the rate of pregnancy risk. At 4-month follow-up, the rate of alcohol-exposed pregnancy risk was significantly lower in the intervention (20.2%) than the control condition (34.9%), (P < .02). Assignment to the intervention condition halved the odds of women remaining at risk for alcohol-exposed pregnancy, while not receiving the intervention doubled the odds of continued alcohol-exposed pregnancy risk (OR = 2.18; 95% CI = 1.16-4.09). A baseline history of blackouts, continued high blood alcohol drinking days at 1 month, and continued risk for pregnancy at 1 month independently contributed to a multivariate model of continued alcohol-exposed pregnancy risk at 4 month follow-up. BALANCE reduced alcohol-exposed pregnancy risk, with similar outcomes to longer interventions. Because early response predicted sustained alcohol-exposed pregnancy risk reduction, those who fail to achieve initial change could be identified for further intervention. The BALANCE intervention could be adopted into existing student health or university alcohol programs. The risks of unintended pregnancy and alcohol-exposed pregnancy among binge drinking women in college merit greater prevention efforts.
Authors:
Sherry Dyche Ceperich; Karen S Ingersoll
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't     Date:  2011-02-12
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of behavioral medicine     Volume:  34     ISSN:  1573-3521     ISO Abbreviation:  J Behav Med     Publication Date:  2011 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-09-21     Completed Date:  2012-01-27     Revised Date:  2013-06-30    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7807105     Medline TA:  J Behav Med     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  381-95     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Alcohol Drinking*
Alcohol-Related Disorders / psychology*
Contraception Behavior
Counseling / methods*
Ethanol / poisoning
Feedback, Psychological
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Motivation
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications / prevention & control
Pregnancy, Unwanted
Risk Reduction Behavior*
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
K01 MH01688/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; R01 AA014356/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS; R01 AA14356/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
64-17-5/Ethanol
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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