Document Detail


Mortality in 504 infants weighing less than 1501 g at birth and treated in four neonatal intensive care units of south-Belgium between 1976 and 1980.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  4054159     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Mortality was studied in 504 infants weighing less than 1501 g at birth and treated in four neonatal intensive care units of South-Belgium between 1976 and 1980. Two hundred and twenty-one babies died during their stay at the hospital, a mortality rate of 438 per 1000 live births. The neonatal mortality rate (mortality during the first 28 days of life) was 373 per 1000 live-births. Thirty-three infants died after the neonatal period, which is 15% of the total number of deaths. Two-thirds of these post-neonatal deaths were related to complications of diseases associated with pre-term delivery. Mortality rates were higher in infants of less than 1001 g than in those of 1001-1250 g or 1251-1500 birth weight. In each birth weight category, patients born in their own obstetrical departments and referred infants has similar mortality rates. Longitudinal analysis showed improving mortality rates between 1976 and 1977 in the total population of VLBW infants, between 1977 and 1978 in infants of less than 1001 g and in 1980 compared to 1976 in the 1251-1500 g group. There were higher incidences of need for ventilatory assistance, patent ductus arteriosus, necrotising enterocolitis and septicaemia in referred patients of less than 1001 g than in patients born in their own obstetrical departments with comparable birth weight. Artificial ventilation was more often required in referred infants of 1251-1500 g. This study confirms the importance of considering at least the complete hospital stay when analysing mortality in VLBW infants. Infants of less than 1001 g had high mortality, particularly after the neonatal period.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
Authors:
P Gérard; A Bachy; O Battisti; J Senterre; J Rigo; E Adam; P Beauduin; J Bartholomé; S el Bouz
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Comparative Study; Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  European journal of pediatrics     Volume:  144     ISSN:  0340-6199     ISO Abbreviation:  Eur. J. Pediatr.     Publication Date:  1985 Sep 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1985-12-18     Completed Date:  1985-12-18     Revised Date:  2007-11-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7603873     Medline TA:  Eur J Pediatr     Country:  GERMANY, WEST    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  219-24     Citation Subset:  IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Belgium
Congenital Abnormalities / mortality
Ductus Arteriosus, Patent / mortality
Enterocolitis, Pseudomembranous / mortality
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Mortality*
Infant, Low Birth Weight*
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal*
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Meningitis / mortality
Referral and Consultation
Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn / mortality
Sepsis / mortality

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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