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Monosodium glutamate is related to a higher increase in blood pressure over 5 years: findings from the Jiangsu Nutrition Study of Chinese adults.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21372742     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: One large cross-sectional study across four countries suggests that glutamate intake may be inversely associated with blood pressure (BP). The aim of this analysis was to investigate a possible association between monosodium glutamate (MSG) intake and change in blood pressure over 5 years. METHODS: Data from 1227 Chinese men and women who participated in the Jiangsu Nutrition Study (JIN) were analyzed. In this study, MSG intake and blood pressure were quantitatively assessed in 2002, and followed-up in 2007. RESULTS: MSG intake was associated with a significant increase in SBP and DBP. A strong sex interaction was observed in relation to SBP change. Women with high MSG intake were more likely to have increased SBP and DBP. Total glutamate intake was also positively associated with an increase in SBP. In those chronically taking antihypertensive medications, there was a strong association between MSG intake and an increase in DBP. CONCLUSION: MSG intake may have independent BP-increasing effects, especially among women and those taking hypertension medications at baseline and follow-up.
Authors:
Zumin Shi; Baojun Yuan; Anne W Taylor; Yue Dai; Xiaoqun Pan; Tiffany K Gill; Gary A Wittert
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2011-3-2
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of hypertension     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1473-5598     ISO Abbreviation:  -     Publication Date:  2011 Mar 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-3-4     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8306882     Medline TA:  J Hypertens     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
aDepartment of Nutrition and Foodborne Disease Prevention, Jiangsu Provincial Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, Nanjing, China bPopulation Research and Outcome Studies Unit, Department of Health, Australia cDiscipline of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.
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