Document Detail


Monosodium glutamate is not associated with obesity or a greater prevalence of weight gain over 5 years: findings from the Jiangsu Nutrition Study of Chinese adults.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20370941     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Animal studies and one large cross-sectional study of 752 healthy Chinese men and women suggest that monosodium glutamate (MSG) may be associated with overweight/obesity, and these findings raise public concern over the use of MSG as a flavour enhancer in many commercial foods. The aim of this analysis was to investigate a possible association between MSG intake and obesity, and determine whether a greater MSG intake is associated with a clinically significant weight gain over 5 years. Data from 1282 Chinese men and women who participated in the Jiangsu Nutrition Study were analysed. In the present study, MSG intake and body weight were quantitatively assessed in 2002 and followed up in 2007. MSG intake was not associated with significant weight gain after adjusting for age, sex, multiple lifestyle factors and energy intake. When total glutamate intake was added to the model, an inverse association between MSG intake and 5 % weight gain was found (P = 0.028), but when the model was adjusted for either rice intake or food patterns, this association was abolished. These findings indicate that when other food items or dietary patterns are accounted for, no association exists between MSG intake and weight gain.
Authors:
Zumin Shi; Natalie D Luscombe-Marsh; Gary A Wittert; Baojun Yuan; Yue Dai; Xiaoqun Pan; Anne W Taylor
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't     Date:  2010-04-07
Journal Detail:
Title:  The British journal of nutrition     Volume:  104     ISSN:  1475-2662     ISO Abbreviation:  Br. J. Nutr.     Publication Date:  2010 Aug 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-07-21     Completed Date:  2010-08-12     Revised Date:  2010-12-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0372547     Medline TA:  Br J Nutr     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  457-63     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition and Foodborne Disease Prevention, Jiangsu Provincial Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, 172 Jiangsu Road, Nanjing, China. zumins@vip.sina.com
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Body Weight / drug effects*
Diet
Female
Food Additives / pharmacology*
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity / etiology*
Oryza sativa
Sodium Glutamate / pharmacology*
Weight Gain / drug effects*
Young Adult
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Food Additives; 142-47-2/Sodium Glutamate
Comments/Corrections
Comment In:
Br J Nutr. 2010 Dec;104(11):1729; author reply 1730   [PMID:  20691132 ]

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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