Document Detail

Molecular evidence of an interaction between prenatal environmental exposures and birth outcomes in a multiethnic population.
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MedLine Citation:
PMID:  15064172     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Inner-city, minority populations are high-risk groups for adverse birth outcomes and also are more likely to be exposed to environmental contaminants, including environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), and other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) found in urban air. In a sample of nonsmoking African-American and Dominican women, we evaluated the effects on birth outcomes of prenatal exposure to ETS, using questionnaire data and plasma cotinine as a biomarker of exposure, and environmental PAHs using BaP-DNA adducts as a molecular dosimeter. We previously reported that among African Americans, high prenatal exposure to PAHs estimated by prenatal personal air monitoring was associated with lower birth weight (p = 0.003) and smaller head circumference (p = 0.01) after adjusting for potential confounders. In the present analysis, self-reported ETS was associated with decreased head circumference (p = 0.04). BaP-DNA adducts were not correlated with ETS or dietary PAHs. There was no main effect of BaP-DNA adducts on birth outcomes. However, there was a significant interaction between the two pollutants such that the combined exposure to high ETS and high adducts had a significant multiplicative effect on birth weight (p = 0.04) and head circumference (p = 0.01) after adjusting for ethnicity, sex of newborns, maternal body mass index, dietary PAHs, and gestational age. This study provides evidence that combined exposure to environmental pollutants at levels currently encountered in New York City adversely affects fetal development.
Authors:
Frederica P Perera; Virginia Rauh; Robin M Whyatt; Wei-Yann Tsai; John T Bernert; Yi-Hsuan Tu; Howard Andrews; Judyth Ramirez; Lirong Qu; Deliang Tang
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Environmental health perspectives     Volume:  112     ISSN:  0091-6765     ISO Abbreviation:  Environ. Health Perspect.     Publication Date:  2004 Apr 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2004-04-05     Completed Date:  2004-11-10     Revised Date:  2013-05-23    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0330411     Medline TA:  Environ Health Perspect     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  626-30     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, 60 Haven Avenue #B-109, New York, NY 10032, USA. Fpp1@columbia.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
African Americans
Benzo(a)pyrene
Biological Markers / blood
Birth Weight / drug effects
Body Constitution
Carcinogens, Environmental / analysis
Cotinine / blood
DNA Adducts / blood
Embryonic and Fetal Development / drug effects*
Environmental Pollutants / toxicity*
Female
Hispanic Americans
Humans
Infant, Newborn
New York City
Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic / analysis
Pregnancy
Tobacco Smoke Pollution / analysis
Urban Health
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
5R01 ES 08977/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS; P01 ES009600/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS; P50 ES 09600/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS; R01 ES 012468/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS; R01 ES 10565/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS; R01 ES 111158/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS; R01 ES008977/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS; R01 ES010165/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS; RR 00065/RR/NCRR NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Biological Markers; 0/Carcinogens, Environmental; 0/DNA Adducts; 0/Environmental Pollutants; 0/Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic; 0/Tobacco Smoke Pollution; 0/benzo(a)pyrene-DNA adduct; 486-56-6/Cotinine; 50-32-8/Benzo(a)pyrene
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Full Text
Journal Information
Journal ID (nlm-ta): Environ Health Perspect
ISSN: 0091-6765
Article Information
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Print publication date: Month: 4 Year: 2004
Volume: 112 Issue: 5
First Page: 626 Last Page: 630
ID: 1241932
PubMed Id: 15064172

Molecular evidence of an interaction between prenatal environmental exposures and birth outcomes in a multiethnic population.
Frederica P Perera
Virginia Rauh
Robin M Whyatt
Wei-Yann Tsai
John T Bernert
Yi-Hsuan Tu
Howard Andrews
Judyth Ramirez
Lirong Qu
Deliang Tang
Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, 60 Haven Avenue #B-109, New York, NY 10032, USA. Fpp1@columbia.edu


Article Categories:
  • Research Article


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