Document Detail


Modern doctors, the community and old-fashioned tuberculosis.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  7404003     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The high prevalence of tuberculosis in Transkei affects every homestead. Professional zeal in the treatment of patients is not enough. The First-World doctor used to be handicapped by deficient training in epidemiology, the organization of health care, and health education. He must also be trained in cultural science, to understand the nature of any community. Urban culture is contrasted with rural culture, the social characteristics of which can compensate for the weakness of alien and limited health services. An improved community approach has contributed to the observed decline in the risk of tuberculosis infection in Transkei.
Authors:
R F Ingle
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  South African medical journal = Suid-Afrikaanse tydskrif vir geneeskunde     Volume:  57     ISSN:  0256-9574     ISO Abbreviation:  S. Afr. Med. J.     Publication Date:  1980 Apr 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1980-10-27     Completed Date:  1980-10-27     Revised Date:  2014-09-12    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0404520     Medline TA:  S Afr Med J     Country:  SOUTH AFRICA    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  714-6     Citation Subset:  IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Africa, Southern
Community Medicine
Developing Countries*
Humans
Rural Population
Tuberculosis / epidemiology*

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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