Document Detail


Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter Opener Spermine Attenuates the Cerebral Protection of Diazoxide through Apoptosis in Rats.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23954597     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: It is reported that ischemic penumbra is a dynamic process, in which irreversible necrosis in the center of ischemia propagates to the neighboring tissue over time. Recent research has indicated that mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium channels (mitoKATP) opener diazoxide plays an important role in cerebral protection; however, the role of mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) in the effect of diazoxide on penumbra and infarct core remains unclear.
METHODS: Adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 5 groups: the Sham group, the ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) group, the diazoxide and ischemia-reperfusion (Dzx + I/R) group, the diazoxide and spermine and ischemia-reperfusion (Dzx + Sper + I/R) group, and the spermine and ischemia-reperfusion (Sper + I/R) group. The animals were exposed to 24-hour reperfusion after 2-hour ischemia. Diazoxide and spermine were administrated at 30 minutes or 10 minutes before the beginning of ischemia or reperfusion, respectively. After 24-hour reperfusion, animals were given neurologic performance tests and when overdosed with general anesthesia their brains were excised for infarct volume, apoptosis, and immunohistochemical.
RESULTS: Rats in the Dzx + I/R group displayed improved neurologic deficits, decreased infarct volume in cortex but not in subcortex, and apoptosis (evidenced by decreased terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end lebeling-positive percentage and the immunohistochemistry of cytochrome c) in cortex caused by ischemia/reperfusion. Rats in the Dzx + Sper + I/R group displayed worse neurologic deficits, larger infarct volume in cortex but not in subcortex, and more apoptosis both in penumbra and infarct core of cortex than those in the Dzx + I/R group.
CONCLUSIONS: Results in our study suggested that diazoxide improved neurologic deficits, decreased infarct volume in cortex but not in subcortex, and apoptosis in cortex against ischemia/reperfusion injury is mediated by spermine.
Authors:
Lei Zhang; Xiujuan Gao; Xin Yuan; Huanli Dong; Zongwang Zhang; Shilei Wang
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Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2013-8-15
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of stroke and cerebrovascular diseases : the official journal of National Stroke Association     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1532-8511     ISO Abbreviation:  J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis     Publication Date:  2013 Aug 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-8-19     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9111633     Medline TA:  J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Affiliation:
Department of Anesthesiology, Liaocheng People's Hospital, Liaocheng, Shandong, China.
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