Document Detail


Microsurgical breast reconstruction for nipple-sparing mastectomy.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23358009     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Data-Review    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: : Nipple-sparing mastectomy warrants thorough preoperative evaluation to effectively achieve risk reduction, high patient satisfaction, and improved aesthetic outcome. To the authors' knowledge, this review represents the largest series of microsurgical breast reconstructions following nipple-sparing mastectomies.
METHODS: : All patients undergoing nipple-sparing mastectomy with microsurgical immediate breast reconstruction treated at New York University Medical Center (2007-2011) were identified. Patient demographics, breast cancer history, intraoperative details, complications, and revision operations were examined. Descriptive statistical analysis, including t test or regression analysis, was performed.
RESULTS: : In 51 patients, 85 free flap breast reconstructions (n = 85) were performed. The majority of flaps were performed for prophylactic indications [n = 55 (64.7 percent)], mostly through vertical incisions [n = 40 (47.0 percent)]. Donor sites included abdominally based [n = 66 (77.6 percent)], profunda artery perforator [n = 12 (14.1 percent)], transverse upper gracilis [n = 6 (7.0 percent)], and superior gluteal artery perforator [n = 1 (1.2 percent)] flaps. The most common complications were mastectomy skin flap necrosis [n = 11 (12.7 percent)] and nipple necrosis [n = 11 (12.7 percent)]. There was no correlation between mastectomy skin flap or nipple necrosis and choice of incision, mastectomy specimen weight, body mass index, or age (p > 0.05). However, smoking history was associated with nipple necrosis (p < 0.01).
CONCLUSIONS: : This series represents a high-volume experience with nipple-sparing mastectomy followed by immediate microsurgical reconstruction. When appropriately executed, it can deliver low complication rates.
CLINICAL QUESTION/LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: : Therapeutic, IV.
Authors:
Neil Tanna; P Niclas Broer; Katie E Weichman; Michael Alperovich; Christina Y Ahn; Robert J Allen; Mihye Choi; Nolan S Karp; Pierre B Saadeh; Jamie P Levine
Related Documents :
24592119 - Basal cell carcinoma - diagnosis.
19366899 - Amg 479, a fully human anti-insulin-like growth factor receptor type i monoclonal antib...
7757999 - Malignant breast epithelium selects for insulin-like growth factor ii expression in bre...
24636439 - Extraordinary giant basal cell carcinoma with full-thickness infiltration of the abdomi...
24667879 - Management of mastectomy skin flap necrosis in autologous breast reconstruction.
19012249 - Altered growth pattern, not altered growth per se, is the hallmark of early lesions pre...
15616829 - Human glutathione s-transferase a1, t1, m1, and p1 polymorphisms and susceptibility to ...
18326919 - Is there a standard of care for the management of advanced pancreatic cancer?. highligh...
8253569 - Thyroid mass.
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Plastic and reconstructive surgery     Volume:  131     ISSN:  1529-4242     ISO Abbreviation:  Plast. Reconstr. Surg.     Publication Date:  2013 Feb 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-01-29     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  1306050     Medline TA:  Plast Reconstr Surg     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  139e-47e     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Affiliation:
New York, N.Y. From the Institute of Reconstructive Plastic Surgery, New York University.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  A Report of the ASPS Task Force on Regenerative Medicine: Opportunities for Plastic Surgery.
Next Document:  Surgical angiogenesis with short-term immunosuppression maintains bone viability in rabbit allogenic...