Document Detail


Is the metabolic syndrome a "small baby" syndrome?: the bogalusa heart study.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22831273     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: Metabolic syndrome has been called a "small baby syndrome," but other analyses suggest that postnatal growth is more important than birthweight, or that large babies are also at risk. The aim of this analysis was to examine whether there was a relationship between both low and high birthweight and metabolic syndrome, using multiple definitions of metabolic syndrome, and to determine whether this relationship varied by body size across the life course.
METHODS: Data from the Bogalusa Heart Study, a study of cardiovascular disease in children and young adults, were linked to birth certificate data. Metabolic syndrome was defined by the National Cholesterol Education Program, the International Diabetes Foundation, and the World Health Organization (WHO) definition. Small-for-gestational-age (SGA) was defined as birthweight <10(th) percentile by sex for gestational age and large-for-gestational-age (LGA) as birthweight >90(th) percentile. Birthweight-for-gestational-age was also examined as a continuous predictor. Chi-squared tests and logistic regression were used to examine the relationship between birth size and metabolic syndrome.
RESULTS: Higher birthweight-for-gestational-age was associated with a reduced risk of metabolic syndrome, especially by the WHO definition. After adjustment for body mass index (BMI), categorized birthweight was associated with metabolic syndrome, with the protective associations with LGA being stronger than the positive associations with SGA. Among the individual components of metabolic syndrome, higher waist circumference was associated with both SGA and LGA after BMI was controlled for. Effects of SGA and BMI at any age were largely independent rather than interactive.
CONCLUSIONS: SGA is associated with some, but not all, components of metabolic syndrome. The relationship between SGA and metabolic syndrome is partially confounded by later BMI.
Authors:
Emily W Harville; Sathanur Srinivasan; Wei Chen; Gerald S Berenson
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural     Date:  2012-07-25
Journal Detail:
Title:  Metabolic syndrome and related disorders     Volume:  10     ISSN:  1557-8518     ISO Abbreviation:  Metab Syndr Relat Disord     Publication Date:  2012 Dec 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-11-20     Completed Date:  2013-04-24     Revised Date:  2013-12-05    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101150318     Medline TA:  Metab Syndr Relat Disord     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  413-21     Citation Subset:  IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
Birth Weight / physiology*
Cardiovascular Diseases / epidemiology,  etiology
Child
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Fetal Macrosomia / complications,  epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight / growth & development,  metabolism,  physiology
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age / growth & development,  metabolism,  physiology*
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X / epidemiology,  etiology*
Young Adult
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
AG16592/AG/NIA NIH HHS; HD43820/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; HL38844/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; K12HD043451/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; R01 AG016592/AG/NIA NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections

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