Document Detail


Meditation or exercise for preventing acute respiratory infection: a randomized controlled trial.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22778122     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
PURPOSE: This study was designed to evaluate potential preventive effects of meditation or exercise on incidence, duration, and severity of acute respiratory infection (ARI) illness.
METHODS: Community-recruited adults aged 50 years and older were randomized to 1 of 3 study groups: 8-week training in mindfulness meditation, matched 8-week training in moderate-intensity sustained exercise, or observational control. The primary outcome was area-under-the-curve global illness severity during a single cold and influenza season, using the Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey (WURSS-24) to assess severity. Health care visits and days of missed work were counted. Nasal wash collected during ARI illness was assayed for neutrophils, interleukin-8, and viral nucleic acid.
RESULTS: Of 154 adults randomized into the study, 149 completed the trial (82% female, 94% white, mean age 59.3 ± 6.6 years). There were 27 ARI episodes and 257 days of ARI illness in the meditation group (n = 51), 26 episodes and 241 illness days in the exercise group (n = 47), and 40 episodes and 453 days in the control group (n = 51). Mean global severity was 144 for meditation, 248 for exercise, and 358 for control. Compared with control, global severity was significantly lower for meditation (P = .004). Both global severity and total days of illness (duration) trended toward being lower for the exercise group (P=.16 and P=.032, respectively), as did illness duration for the meditation group (P=.034). Adjusting for covariates using zero-inflated multivariate regression models gave similar results. There were 67 ARI-related days of-work missed in the control group, 32 in the exercise group (P = .041), and 16 in the meditation group (P <.001). Health care visits did not differ significantly. Viruses were identified in 54% of samples from meditation, 42% from exercise, and 54% from control groups. Neutrophil count and interleukin-8 levels were similar among intervention groups.
CONCLUSIONS: Training in meditation or exercise may be effective in reducing ARI illness burden.
Authors:
Bruce Barrett; Mary S Hayney; Daniel Muller; David Rakel; Ann Ward; Chidi N Obasi; Roger Brown; Zhengjun Zhang; Aleksandra Zgierska; James Gern; Rebecca West; Tola Ewers; Shari Barlow; Michele Gassman; Christopher L Coe
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Annals of family medicine     Volume:  10     ISSN:  1544-1717     ISO Abbreviation:  Ann Fam Med     Publication Date:    2012 Jul-Aug
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-07-10     Completed Date:  2012-11-16     Revised Date:  2013-07-12    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101167762     Medline TA:  Ann Fam Med     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  337-46     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Family Medicine, University of Wisconsin - Madison, 1100 Delaplaine Ct, Madison, WI 53715, USA. bruce.barrett@fammed.wisc.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Acute Disease
Adaptation, Psychological
Common Cold
Confidence Intervals
Exercise Therapy / methods*,  psychology
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Influenza, Human / prevention & control,  psychology
Male
Meditation / methods*,  psychology
Middle Aged
Psychometrics
Respiratory Tract Infections / prevention & control*,  psychology,  therapy
Self Report
Severity of Illness Index
Stress, Psychological
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
1R01AT004313/AT/NCCAM NIH HHS; K23 AA017508/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS; K23 AT00051/AT/NCCAM NIH HHS; K24 AT006543/AT/NCCAM NIH HHS; UL1 TR000427/TR/NCATS NIH HHS; UL1RR025011/RR/NCRR NIH HHS
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From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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