Document Detail


Mechanical properties of native and ex vivo remodeled porcine saphenous veins.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  15936764     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
When grafted into an arterial environment in vivo, veins remodel in response to the new mechanical environment, thereby changing their mechanical properties and potentially impacting their patency as bypass grafts. Porcine saphenous veins were subjected for one week to four different ex vivo hemodynamic environments in which pressure and shear stress were varied independently, as well as an environment that mimicked that of an arterial bypass graft. After one week of ex vivo culture, the mechanical properties of intact saphenous veins were evaluated to relate specific aspects of the mechanical environment to vein remodeling and corresponding changes in mechanics. The compliance of all cultured veins tended to be less than that of fresh veins; however, this trend was more due to changes in medial and luminal areas than changes in the intrinsic properties of the vein wall. A combination of medial hypertrophy and eutrophic remodeling leads to significantly smaller (p<0.05) wall stresses measured in all cultured veins except those subjected to bypass graft conditions relative to stresses measured in fresh veins at corresponding pressures. Our results suggest that the mechanical environment effects changes in vessel size, as well as the nature of the remodeling, which contribute to altering vein mechanical properties.
Authors:
Rebecca J Gusic; Matus Petko; Richard Myung; J William Gaynor; Keith J Gooch
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Publication Detail:
Type:  In Vitro; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of biomechanics     Volume:  38     ISSN:  0021-9290     ISO Abbreviation:  J Biomech     Publication Date:  2005 Sep 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2005-07-18     Completed Date:  2005-11-07     Revised Date:  2009-11-11    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0157375     Medline TA:  J Biomech     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1770-9     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
The Institute for Medicine and Engineering, Department of Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Blood Pressure
Elasticity
Mechanotransduction, Cellular*
Saphenous Vein / pathology*,  physiopathology*
Shear Strength
Stress, Mechanical
Swine
Tunica Intima / pathology*,  physiopathology*
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
R01 HL64388-01A1/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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