Document Detail


Measuring maternal mortality in developing Pacific island countries: experience with the sisterhood method in the Solomon Islands.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  8022583     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
AIMS: To estimate the maternal mortality rate in the Solomon Islands, and to assist health planning and implementation of effective interventions. METHOD: The sisterhood method, an indirect technique for deriving population-based estimates of maternal mortality was used in interviews with 2580 randomly chosen women reporting on the fertility and mortality experience of their sisters. RESULTS: The maternal mortality ratio in this study was 549 per 100,000 (95% CI 431, 684). This equates to one maternal death in every 180 pregnancies. CONCLUSION: The sisterhood method was found to be easy to administer, inexpensive and quick, and is recommended as a measurement tool to other developing countries.
The aim was to estimate the maternal mortality rate in the Solomon Islands and to assist health planning in the implementation of effective interventions. In many Pacific Island countries, registration of deaths is inaccurate and incomplete. The survey in the Solomon Islands was conducted in June 1992, and 2580 randomly chosen women were interviewed using the standard World Health Organization cluster sampling technique. The sisterhood method, an indirect technique for deriving population-based estimates of maternal mortality, was used in interviews reporting on the fertility and mortality experience of subjects' sisters. The sisterhood method was developed at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in 1987 as an indirect technique for deriving population-based estimates of maternal mortality. In order to calculate the proportions of sisters dying of maternal causes, 4 questions were asked about deaths of their sisters 15 years of age or over during pregnancy, delivery or the puerperium. These, together with the 5-year age group of the respondents, formed the basic data for deriving an estimate of maternal mortality. An overall estimate of lifetime risk of maternal death across all respondent age groups was derived by dividing the total reported maternal deaths by the sum of the units of risk exposure across all age groups (73/2227 = 0.033) or a lifetime risk of 1 in 30. Through a series of well-defined mathematical calculations, it was possible to convert the information into retrospective estimates of maternal mortality. The maternal mortality ratio in this study was 549/100,000 (95% CI 431, 684), equivalent to 1 maternal death in every 180 pregnancies. The sisterhood method was found to be easy to administer, inexpensive, and quick, and is recommended as a measurement tool to other developing countries. The publication of the results has prompted the government of the Solomon Islands to act.
Authors:
J O'Brien; T Wierzba; S Knott; J Pikacha
Related Documents :
19050393 - The detection of cytomegalovirus dna in maternal plasma is associated with mortality in...
12033553 - The effects of domestic violence during pregnancy on maternal and infant health.
20123153 - Early nutritional support and outcomes in elbw infants.
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The New Zealand medical journal     Volume:  107     ISSN:  0028-8446     ISO Abbreviation:  N. Z. Med. J.     Publication Date:  1994 Jul 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1994-08-02     Completed Date:  1994-08-02     Revised Date:  2010-03-24    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0401067     Medline TA:  N Z Med J     Country:  NEW ZEALAND    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  268-9     Citation Subset:  IM; J    
Affiliation:
Ministry of Health, Solomon Islands.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
Data Collection / methods*
Family
Female
Humans
Maternal Mortality*
Melanesia / epidemiology
Middle Aged
Pregnancy

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Kawerau revisited: hepatitis A and B seroprevalence in 1984 and 1993.
Next Document:  Vision evaluation in people with Down's syndrome.