Document Detail


Maternal label and gesture use affects acquisition of specific object names.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20214842     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Process    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Ten mothers were observed prospectively, interacting with their infants aged 0 ; 10 in two contexts (picture description and noun description). Maternal communicative behaviours were coded for volubility, gestural production and labelling style. Verbal labelling events were categorized into three exclusive categories: label only; label plus deictic gesture; label plus iconic gesture. We evaluated the predictive relations between maternal communicative style and children's subsequent acquisition of ten target nouns. Strong relations were observed between maternal communicative style and children's acquisition of the target nouns. Further, even controlling for maternal volubility and maternal labelling, maternal use of iconic gestures predicted the timing of acquisition of nouns in comprehension. These results support the proposition that maternal gestural input facilitates linguistic development, and suggest that such facilitation may be a function of gesture type.
Authors:
Maria Zammit; Graham Schafer
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't     Date:  2010-03-10
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of child language     Volume:  38     ISSN:  1469-7602     ISO Abbreviation:  J Child Lang     Publication Date:  2011 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-12-08     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0425743     Medline TA:  J Child Lang     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  201-21     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Reading and Faculty of Health, Leeds Metropolitan University. Civic Quarter, Calverley Street, Leeds, UK. m.l.zammit@leedsmet.ac.uk
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