Document Detail


Maternal genetic effects set the potential for evolution in a free-living vertebrate population.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  15715846     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Heritable maternal effects have important consequences for the evolutionary dynamics of phenotypic traits under selection, but have only rarely been tested for or quantified in evolutionary studies. Here we estimate maternal effects on early-life traits in a feral population of Soay sheep (Ovis aries) from St Kilda, Scotland. We then partition the maternal effects into genetic and environmental components to obtain the first direct estimates of maternal genetic effects in a free-living population, and furthermore test for covariance between direct and maternal genetic effects. Using an animal model approach, direct heritabilities (h2) were low but maternal genetic effects (m2) represented a relatively large proportion of the total phenotypic variance for each trait (birth weight m2=0.119, birth date m2=0.197, natal litter size m2=0.211). A negative correlation between direct and maternal genetic effects was estimated for each trait, but was only statistically significant for natal litter size (ram= -0.714). Total heritabilities (incorporating variance from heritable maternal effects and the direct-maternal genetic covariance) were significant for birth weight and birth date but not for natal litter size. Inadequately specified models greatly overestimated additive genetic variance and hence direct h2 (by a factor of up to 6.45 in the case of birth date). We conclude that failure to model heritable maternal variance can result in over- or under-estimation of the potential for traits to respond to selection, and advocate an increased effort to explicitly measure maternal genetic effects in evolutionary studies.
Authors:
A J Wilson; D W Coltman; J M Pemberton; A D J Overall; K A Byrne; L E B Kruuk
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of evolutionary biology     Volume:  18     ISSN:  1010-061X     ISO Abbreviation:  J. Evol. Biol.     Publication Date:  2005 Mar 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2005-02-17     Completed Date:  2005-04-22     Revised Date:  2006-11-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8809954     Medline TA:  J Evol Biol     Country:  Switzerland    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  405-14     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. alastair.wilson@ed.ac.uk
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Animals, Wild / genetics*
Birth Weight
Evolution*
Female
Litter Size
Models, Genetic*
Phenotype*
Quantitative Trait, Heritable*
Scotland
Sheep / genetics*

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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