Document Detail


Maternal folate and other vitamin supplementation during pregnancy and risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the offspring.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  19839053     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The Australian Study of Causes of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Children (Aus-ALL) was designed to test the hypothesis, raised by a previous Western Australian study, that maternal folic acid supplementation during pregnancy might reduce the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Aus-ALL was a national, population-based, multicenter case-control study that prospectively recruited 416 cases and 1,361 controls between 2003 and 2007. Detailed information was collected about maternal use of folic acid and other vitamin supplements before and during the index pregnancy. Data were analyzed using logistic regression, adjusting for matching factors and potential confounders. A meta-analysis with the results of previous studies of folic acid supplementation was also conducted. We found weak evidence of a protective effect of maternal folate supplementation before pregnancy against risk of childhood ALL, but no evidence for a protective effect of its use during pregnancy. A meta-analysis including this and 2 other studies, but not the study that raised the hypothesis, also found little evidence that folate supplementation during pregnancy protects against ALL: the summary odds ratios (ORs) for folate supplementation were 1.06 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.77-1.48] with reference to no folate supplementation and 1.02 (95% CI: 0.86-1.20) with reference to no vitamin supplementation. For vitamin supplementation in general, the summary OR from a meta-analysis of 5 studies-including Aus-ALL-was 0.83 (95% CI: 0.73-0.94). Vitamin supplementation in pregnancy may protect against childhood ALL, but this effect is unlikely to be large or, if real, specifically due to folate.
Authors:
Elizabeth Milne; Jill A Royle; Margaret Miller; Carol Bower; Nicholas H de Klerk; Helen D Bailey; Frank van Bockxmeer; John Attia; Rodney J Scott; Murray D Norris; Michelle Haber; Judith R Thompson; Lin Fritschi; Glenn M Marshall; Bruce K Armstrong
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Meta-Analysis; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  International journal of cancer. Journal international du cancer     Volume:  126     ISSN:  1097-0215     ISO Abbreviation:  Int. J. Cancer     Publication Date:  2010 Jun 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-03-30     Completed Date:  2010-04-23     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0042124     Medline TA:  Int J Cancer     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  2690-9     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Telethon Institute for Child Health Research, Centre for Child Health Research, West Perth, Western Australia 6872, Australia. lizm@ichr.uwa.edu.au
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Birth Order
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Dietary Supplements / adverse effects*
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Maternal-Fetal Exchange*
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / epidemiology*
Pregnancy
Risk Factors
Vitamins / adverse effects*,  therapeutic use*
Western Australia / epidemiology
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Vitamins

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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