Document Detail


Maternal endocrine activation during pregnancy alters neurobehavioral state in primate infants.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  9494629     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether maternal endocrine activation during pregnancy would affect the neurobehavioral state of primate offspring in a manner similar to that observed in human infants from pregnancies involving maternal substance abuse or maternal stress.
METHOD: Twenty-two rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) infants were derived from females administered either adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), which increased the mother's endocrine activity, or saline solutions for 14 consecutive days during mid-pregnancy. On days 15 and 30 postpartum, infants underwent brief separations from their mothers and were videotaped for later evaluation of neurobehavioral state.
RESULTS: Infants from mothers administered ACTH spent significantly more time in a drowsy state than did controls (p < .04), and the increased drowsiness tended to be most pronounced during the postseparation period, when acute stress was highest. In contrast, controls remained in a more active alert state (p < .03), presumably searching for their mother, a species-typical adaptive response to maternal separation. Female infants spent more time in distressed state than did males on day 15, and the proportion of time in distressed state decreased in all infants after administration of .2 ml of 24% sucrose solution.
CONCLUSION: The results demonstrate that neurobehavioral state alterations are found in infants from mothers with increased endocrine activity during pregnancy. Neurobehavioral state disorganization can have an adverse impact on the human infant's concurrent and subsequent occupational performance. These findings establish the usefulness of the nonhuman primate model for advancing knowledge on early contributions to the development of human infant occupational behavior.
Authors:
E C Roughton; M L Schneider; L J Bromley; C L Coe
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The American journal of occupational therapy : official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association     Volume:  52     ISSN:  0272-9490     ISO Abbreviation:  Am J Occup Ther     Publication Date:  1998 Feb 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1998-04-21     Completed Date:  1998-04-21     Revised Date:  2012-08-27    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7705978     Medline TA:  Am J Occup Ther     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  90-8     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Kinesiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison 53706-1532, USA.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adrenocorticotropic Hormone / administration & dosage,  pharmacology*
Animals
Animals, Newborn
Anxiety, Separation
Behavior, Animal / drug effects*
Endocrine System / drug effects*,  metabolism
Female
Humans
Macaca mulatta
Male
Models, Biological
Motor Activity / drug effects
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Animal / drug effects*,  metabolism
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Stress, Psychological
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
AA10079/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS; MH41659/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; MH48417/MH/NIMH NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
9002-60-2/Adrenocorticotropic Hormone

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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