Document Detail


Maternal consumption of Lake Ontario salmon in rats produces behavioral changes in the offspring.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  9460168     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The current study assessed the effects of maternal, paternal, or combined parental consumption of Lake Ontario salmon in rats on the behavior of their offspring. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were put on a 30 day diet of either ground rat chow containing 30% Lake Ontario salmon (LAKE) or 30% Pacific Ocean salmon (OCEAN). These females were then mated with adult male rats similarly exposed (LAKE or OCEAN). An additional control group of males and females who were fed ground rat chow (MASH) only were also mated. These pairing combinations resulted in five offspring groups: LAKE-LAKE, LAKE-OCEAN, OCEAN-LAKE, OCEAN-OCEAN, MASH-MASH. When the offspring reached 80 days of age, they were tested for reactivity to frustrative nonreward using runway successive negative contrast, which has been repeatedly shown to be increased in adult rats fed Ontario salmon. Consistent with previous work, results showed that the behavior of the OCEAN-OCEAN rats did not differ from the MASH-MASH group, indicating that a salmon diet per se does not cause behavioral change. However, the offspring of dams who consumed Lake Ontario salmon (LAKE-LAKE and OCEAN-LAKE) showed an increased depression effect relative to controls. There was little evidence of a paternal effect. A follow-up experiment employed cross-fostering to determine the relative contribution of pre- and/or postnatal exposure to Lake Ontario salmon consumption on offspring behavior. Rat pups were cross-fostered to or from dams who consumed Lake Ontario salmon during gestation and parturition. Results from two separate replications indicated that prenatal (LAKE to OCEAN) exposure alone or postnatal (OCEAN to LAKE) exposure alone produced a large increase in successive negative contrast relative to controls (OCEAN to OCEAN). These data are strong evidence of behavioral changes produced by maternal consumption of Lake Ontario salmon in the offspring rat. Further, they indicate that either prenatal or postnatal exposure alone is sufficient to produce behavioral changes in the offspring.
Authors:
H B Daly; P W Stewart; L Lunkenheimer; D Sargent
Related Documents :
7972398 - Wheel-running in discrete trial and operant paradigms under various effort requirements.
1656398 - Peptidergic transmission in the brain. vi. behavioral consequences of central activation.
21958848 - Pet study using [(11)c]ftimd with ultra-high specific activity to evaluate i(2)-imidazo...
12668218 - Pro-leu-glycinamide and its peptidomimetic, paopa, attenuate haloperidol induced vacuou...
1251808 - Resistance of intestinal triglyceride transport capacity in the rat to adaptation to al...
9046368 - Contrasting effects of urethane, ketamine, and thiopental anesthesia on ethanol-clonidi...
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Toxicology and industrial health     Volume:  14     ISSN:  0748-2337     ISO Abbreviation:  Toxicol Ind Health     Publication Date:    1998 Jan-Apr
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1998-03-04     Completed Date:  1998-03-04     Revised Date:  2006-11-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8602702     Medline TA:  Toxicol Ind Health     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  25-39     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Center for Neurobehavioral Effects of Environmental Toxics, State University of New York at Oswego 13126, USA. PSTEWAR1@oswego.edu
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Behavior, Animal / drug effects*
Depression / chemically induced*
Diet*
Female
Food Contamination
Food Preservation
Male
Ontario
Pacific Ocean
Paternal Exposure
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects*
Rats
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Salmon*
Xenobiotics / adverse effects*
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Xenobiotics

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Environmental neurotoxic effects: the search for new protocols in functional teratology.
Next Document:  Changes in thyroid hormone economy following consumption of environmentally contaminated Great Lakes...