Document Detail


Maternal cocaine use: estimated effects on mother-child play interactions in the preschool period.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  12177564     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The study objective was to evaluate the quality of parent-child interactions in preschool-aged children exposed prenatally to cocaine. African-American mothers and their full-term newborns (n = 343) were enrolled prospectively at birth and classified as either prenatally cocaine-exposed (n = 157) or non-cocaine-exposed (n = 186) on the basis of maternal self-report and bioassays. Follow-up evaluations at 3 years of age (mean age, 40 mo) included a videotaped dyadic play session and maternal interviews to assess ongoing drug use and maternal psychological distress. Play interactions were coded using a modified version of Egeland et al's Teaching Task coding scheme. Regression analyses indicated cocaine-associated deficits in mother-child interaction, even with statistical adjustment for multiple suspected influences on interaction dynamics. Mother-child interactions were most impaired in cocaine-exposed dyads when the mother continued to report cocaine use at the 3-year follow-up. Multivariate profile analysis of the Egeland interaction subscales indicated greater maternal intrusiveness and hostility, poorer quality of instruction, lower maternal confidence, and diminished child persistence in the cocaine-exposed dyads.
Authors:
Arnise L Johnson; Connie E Morrow; Veronica H Accornero; Lihua Xue; James C Anthony; Emmalee S Bandstra
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of developmental and behavioral pediatrics : JDBP     Volume:  23     ISSN:  0196-206X     ISO Abbreviation:  J Dev Behav Pediatr     Publication Date:  2002 Aug 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2002-08-14     Completed Date:  2002-10-16     Revised Date:  2014-09-24    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8006933     Medline TA:  J Dev Behav Pediatr     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  191-202     Citation Subset:  IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Child, Preschool
Cocaine / analysis
Cocaine-Related Disorders / psychology*
Cohort Studies
Depression / diagnosis,  psychology*
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Behavior / psychology*
Meconium / chemistry
Mother-Child Relations*
Mothers / psychology*
Play and Playthings*
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Videotape Recording
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
M01 RR 05280/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; M01 RR005280-08/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; R01 DA006556-10S1/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; R01 DA06656/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; T32 DA007292/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; T32 DA007292-16/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; T3207292//PHS HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
I5Y540LHVR/Cocaine
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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