Document Detail


Maternal carbon dioxide level during labor and its possible effect on fetal cerebral oxygenation: Mini review.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22765270     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
During pregnancy, and especially during labor, the maternal carbon dioxide level declines considerably. Maternal carbon dioxide levels show a close relation with fetal carbon dioxide levels. The latter affects fetal cerebral oxygenation by regulating cerebral blood flow and shifting the oxyhemoglobin dissociation curve. In addition, maternal hypocapnia appears to impair placental oxygen transfer. Thus, maternal hyperventilation may interfere with optimal fetal cerebral oxygenation. Here, we provide a brief overview of the literature relevant to this issue.
Authors:
Takuji Tomimatsu; Aiko Kakigano; Kazuya Mimura; Tomoko Kanayama; Shinsuke Koyama; Satoko Fujita; Yukiko Taniguchi; Takeshi Kanagawa; Tadashi Kimura
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2012-7-6
Journal Detail:
Title:  The journal of obstetrics and gynaecology research     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1447-0756     ISO Abbreviation:  J. Obstet. Gynaecol. Res.     Publication Date:  2012 Jul 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-7-6     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9612761     Medline TA:  J Obstet Gynaecol Res     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Copyright Information:
© 2012 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2012 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka, Japan.
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