Document Detail


Massage provision by physiotherapists at major athletics events between 1987 and 1998.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  15039270     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: The equivocal findings in the literature on efficacy of massage makes it difficult to assess the requirement for, or justify the use of, specialist massage personnel at major athletics events. However, the use of massage by athletes during training and competition remains popular. OBJECTIVES: To quantify the amount of their time that physiotherapists devote to massage treatment at major athletics events in an attempt to determine the importance of this treatment modality, and to examine whether the use of massage at athletics events is changing over time. METHODS: Data recorded by the head team physiotherapist from 12 major athletics events (national and international events) between 1987 and 1998 were examined. For each event, the data included: total number of treatments administered by the physiotherapist, the treatment modalities used, and the number of attendances for treatment. The amount of massage provided was expressed as a percentage of the total number of treatments for each athletic event, and the pattern of change in use of massage treatment over time was evaluated. RESULTS: The percentage of time spent providing massage treatment ranged from 24.0% to 52.2% of the total number of treatments made. The overall median percentage of total treatments in the form of massage was 45.2%. No significant increase or decrease in the use of massage as a treatment modality was observed between 1987 and 1998 in the athletics events examined (p = 0.95). CONCLUSIONS: A significant proportion of physiotherapists' time is devoted to the delivery of massage treatment at athletics events. The demand for massage treatment has been steady over the time period, in the events for which data are available, indicating a consistent use of this treatment modality. Given the popularity of massage among athletes, consideration should be given to the use of specialist sports massage staff at major athletics events. Furthermore, it would seem prudent to further investigate the efficacy of the treatment.
Authors:
S D R Galloway; J M Watt
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  British journal of sports medicine     Volume:  38     ISSN:  0306-3674     ISO Abbreviation:  Br J Sports Med     Publication Date:  2004 Apr 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2004-03-24     Completed Date:  2004-04-23     Revised Date:  2008-11-20    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0432520     Medline TA:  Br J Sports Med     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  235-6; discussion 237     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Sports Studies, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland, UK. s.d.r.galloway@stir.ac.uk
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Athletic Injuries / rehabilitation*
Great Britain
Humans
Massage / trends,  utilization*

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Exercise induced compartment syndrome in a professional footballer.
Next Document:  Non-participation in sports injury research: why football players choose not to be involved.