Document Detail


"Masculinizing" effect on respiratory morbidity in girls from unlike-sex preterm twins: a possible transchorionic paracrine effect.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  17766488     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVES: Preterm male infants are at a disadvantage when compared with female infants regarding the incidence of respiratory and neurologic morbidity and mortality. At term, female infants from unlike-sex twin pairs have birth weights that are closer to their male co-twins than to girls from like-sex twin pairs. We hypothesized that if the male disadvantage is mediated via factors that affect fetal lung development, there may be a potential effect on the incidence of respiratory distress syndrome and its complications in female infants from unlike-sex pairs. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In this population-based study we used data from the Israel Neonatal Network, which included data from 8858 very low birth weight (500-1500 g) infants of 24 to 34 weeks' gestation. The incidence of morbidity and mortality was compared in male and female infants from singletons and like-sex and unlike-sex twin pairs. Multivariable analyses were used, accounting for relevant confounding variables. RESULTS: Male singletons and like-sex twins were at increased risk for mortality, respiratory distress syndrome, pneumothorax, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, periventricular-intraventricular hemorrhage, and periventricular leukomalacia. However, in unlike-sex twin pairs, no difference was seen in the incidence of respiratory morbidity between male and female twins. The male disadvantage was maintained for mortality and periventricular-intraventricular hemorrhage. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the difference in morbidity and mortality between male and female premature infants represents a male disadvantage as opposed to a female advantage and that this disadvantage may be transferred from boys to girls in unlike-sex twin pairs, perhaps via an intrauterine paracrine effect.
Authors:
Eric S Shinwell; Brian Reichman; Liat Lerner-Geva; Valentina Boyko; Isaac Blickstein;
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Pediatrics     Volume:  120     ISSN:  1098-4275     ISO Abbreviation:  Pediatrics     Publication Date:  2007 Sep 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2007-09-03     Completed Date:  2007-11-08     Revised Date:  2007-11-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0376422     Medline TA:  Pediatrics     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  e447-53     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Neonatology, Kaplan Medical Center, PO Box 1, Rehovot 76100, Israel. eric_s@clalit.org.il
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia / epidemiology
Cerebral Hemorrhage / epidemiology
Databases as Topic
Female
Humans
Infant Mortality
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Leukomalacia, Periventricular / epidemiology
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Paracrine Communication
Pneumothorax / epidemiology
Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn / epidemiology*
Risk Assessment
Sex Factors
Twins*
Comments/Corrections
Comment In:
Pediatrics. 2007 Sep;120(3):638-9   [PMID:  17766536 ]

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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