Document Detail


Managing a massacre: savagery, civility, and gender in Moro Province in the wake of Bud Dajo.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21751483     Owner:  HMD     Status:  In-Process    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
This article examines the delicate ideological maneuverings that shaped American colonial constructions of savagery, civility, and gender in the wake of the Bud Dajo massacre in the Philippines's Muslim south in 1906. It looks particularly at shifting notions of femininity and masculinity as these related to episodes of violence and colonial control. The article concludes that, while the Bud Dajo massacre was a terrible black mark on the American military's record in Mindanao and Sulu, colonial officials ultimately used the event to positively affirm existing discourses of power and justification, which helped to sustain and guide military rule in the Muslim south for another seven years.
Authors:
Michael C Hawkins
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Philippine studies     Volume:  59     ISSN:  0031-7837     ISO Abbreviation:  Philipp Stud     Publication Date:  2011  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-04-06     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  100969730     Medline TA:  Philipp Stud     Country:  Philippines    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  83-105     Citation Subset:  Q    
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