Document Detail


Malnutrition self-screening by using "MUST" in hospital outpatients: validity, reliability, and ease of use.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23034963     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: Although nutritional screening with a tool such as the "Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool" ("MUST") is recommended for outpatients, staff are under pressure to undertake a variety of other tasks. Little attention has been paid to the validity of patient self-screening with "MUST." OBJECTIVE: This study in 205 outpatients with a mean (±SD) age of 55 ± 17 y (56% male) assessed the practicalities of self-screening, its agreement with screening undertaken by a trained health care professional (HCP), and its test-retest reliability. DESIGN: After the participants provided consent, screening was undertaken by the patients themselves and then by a trained HCP who was unaware of the self-screening results. All patients completed an ease-of-use questionnaire. Test-retest reliability of self-screening was established in a subset of 60 patients. RESULTS: A total of 19.6% of patients categorized themselves as "at risk" of malnutrition (9.8% medium, 9.8% high). For the 3-category classification of "MUST" (low, medium, high), agreement between self-screening and HCP screening was 90% (κ = 0.70; SE = 0.058, P < 0.001). For the 2-category classification (low risk, medium + high risk), agreement was 93% (κ = 0.78, SE = 0.057, P < 0.001). Disagreements were not systematically under- or overcategorized. Test-retest reliability was almost perfect (κ = 0.94, P < 0.001). Most patients (71%) completed self-screening in <5 min. Patients found the tool easy or very easy to understand (96%) and complete (98%), with 94% reporting that they were happy to screen themselves. CONCLUSION: Self-screening involving "MUST" in outpatients is acceptable to patients, user-friendly, reliable, and associated with good agreement with HCP screening. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00714324.
Authors:
Abbie L Cawood; Marinos Elia; Sarah Ke Sharp; Rebecca J Stratton
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Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2012-10-3
Journal Detail:
Title:  The American journal of clinical nutrition     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1938-3207     ISO Abbreviation:  Am. J. Clin. Nutr.     Publication Date:  2012 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-10-4     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0376027     Medline TA:  Am J Clin Nutr     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
Institute of Human Nutrition, University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom.
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