Document Detail


Male partner pregnancy-promoting behaviors and adolescent partner violence: findings from a qualitative study with adolescent females.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  17870644     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: To examine the context of pregnancy and sexual health among adolescent females with a history of intimate partner violence (IPV). This paper reports on a subset of females who described abusive male partners' explicit pregnancy-promoting behaviors (ie, messages and behaviors that led females to believe their partner was actively trying to impregnate them). METHODS: Semistructured interviews were conducted with 53 sexually active adolescent females, with known history of IPV, about violence, sexual experiences, and related behaviors. Interviews were analyzed using a content analysis approach; 14 interviews in which females reported that partners were actively trying to impregnate them were further analyzed for pregnancy and contraceptive use. RESULTS: Participants (N = 53) were aged 15 to 20 years, with notable minority representation, 21% African American (n = 11) and 38% Latina (n = 20). Over half (n = 31, 58%) had experienced pregnancy. A key finding was that approximately one quarter of participants (26%, n = 14) reported that their abusive male partners were actively trying to get them pregnant. Females' stories revealed that abusive male partners desiring pregnancy manipulated condom use, sabotaged birth control use, and made explicit statements about wanting her to become pregnant. CONCLUSIONS: Pregnancy-promoting behaviors of male abusive partners may be one potential mechanism underlying associations between adolescent IPV and pregnancy. These findings suggest that exploring pregnancy intentions and behaviors of partners of sexually active adolescents may help to identify youth experiencing IPV. The frequency of birth control sabotage and explicit attempts to cause pregnancy in adolescent IPV needs to be examined at the population level.
Authors:
Elizabeth Miller; Michele R Decker; Elizabeth Reed; Anita Raj; Jeanne E Hathaway; Jay G Silverman
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Ambulatory pediatrics : the official journal of the Ambulatory Pediatric Association     Volume:  7     ISSN:  1530-1567     ISO Abbreviation:  Ambul Pediatr     Publication Date:    2007 Sep-Oct
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2007-09-17     Completed Date:  2007-12-18     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101089367     Medline TA:  Ambul Pediatr     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  360-6     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Center for Reducing Health Disparities, UC Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA. elizabeth.miller@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior / psychology*
Adult
Cohort Studies
Contraception Behavior
Female
Humans
Male
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Unwanted / psychology
Sexual Behavior / psychology*
Spouse Abuse / psychology*
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
U36/CCU300430-23//PHS HHS

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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