Document Detail


Lumbar facet joint and intervertebral disc loading during simulated pelvic obliquity.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23706384     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Intervertebral disc and facet joints are the two primary load-bearing structures of the lumbar spine, and altered loading to these structures may be associated with frontal plane spinal deviations. PURPOSE: To determine the load on the lumbar facet joint and intervertebral disc under simulated frontal plane pelvic obliquity combined loading, an in vitro biomechanical study was conducted. STUDY DESIGN/SETTING: An in vitro biomechanical study using a repeated-measures design was used to compare L4-L5 facet joint and intervertebral disc loading across pure moment and combined loading conditions. METHODS: Eight fresh-frozen lumbosacral specimens were tested under five loading conditions: flexion/extension, lateral bending, axial rotation using pure moment bending (±10 Nm), and two additional tests investigating frontal plane pelvic obliquity and axial rotation (sacrum tilted left 5° and at 10° followed by a ±10-Nm rotation moment). Three-dimensional kinematics, facet load, and intradiscal pressures were recorded from the L4-L5 functional spinal unit. RESULTS: Sagittal and frontal plane loading resulted in significantly smaller facet joint forces compared with conditions implementing a rotation moment (p<.05). The facet joint had the highest peak load during the 10° combined loading condition (124.0±30.2 N) and the lowest peak load in flexion (26.8±16.1 N). Intradiscal pressure was high in lateral flexion (495.6±280.9 kPa) and flexion (429.0±212.9 kPa), whereas intradiscal pressures measured in rotation (253.2±135.0 kPa) and 5° and 10° combined loading conditions were low (255.5±132.7 and 267.1±127.1 kPa, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Facet loading increased during simulated pelvic obliquity in frontal and transverse planes, whereas intradiscal pressures were decreased compared with sagittal and frontal plane motions alone. Altered spinopelvic alignment may increase the loads experienced by spinal tissue, especially the facet joints.
Authors:
John M Popovich; Judson B Welcher; Thomas P Hedman; Wafa Tawackoli; Neel Anand; Thomas C Chen; Kornelia Kulig
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Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2013-5-21
Journal Detail:
Title:  The spine journal : official journal of the North American Spine Society     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1878-1632     ISO Abbreviation:  Spine J     Publication Date:  2013 May 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-5-27     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101130732     Medline TA:  Spine J     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Affiliation:
Division of Biokinesiology and Physical Therapy, University of Southern California, 1540 E. Alcazar St, CHP-155, Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA; Spine Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Laboratory, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Blvd., Davis Building, 6006, Los Angeles, CA, 90048, USA. Electronic address: popovi16@msu.edu.
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