Document Detail


Low sensitivity to alcohol: relations with hangover occurrence and susceptibility in an ecological momentary assessment investigation.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23036210     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: The current investigation tested whether low sensitivity to alcohol, as measured by the Self-Rating of the Effects of Alcohol (SRE) form, is associated with hangover occurrence or resistance, two potentially important predictors of later problematic drinking outcomes.
METHOD: Drinkers who reported using alcohol at least four times in the past month (N = 402) completed the SRE at baseline and used ecological momentary assessment methods with an electronic diary to record drinking behaviors and related experiences over 21 days. Each morning, the diary assessed prior-night drinking behaviors and the presence of current hangover.
RESULTS: After adjustments for sex, body weight, age, and smoking status, higher SRE scores (indicating lower alcohol sensitivity) predicted hangover occurrence on postdrinking mornings (odds ratio [OR] = 1.24 per interquartile range [IQR], p = .003). However, when the number of drinks consumed in the drinking episode was covaried, SRE scores were negatively associated with hangover (OR = 0.67 per IQR, p <.001). An interaction between SRE scores and the number of drinks consumed indicated that low-sensitivity drinkers tend to be differentially resistant to hangover at a given number of drinks. Higher SRE scores were associated with consuming more drinks on average (generalized estimating equations coefficient = 2.20 per IQR, p <.001).
CONCLUSIONS: Individuals lower in alcohol sensitivity appear to be more resistant to hangovers per unit of alcohol. However, they are also more likely to engage in excessive drinking, and this may account for their increased odds of experiencing hangover during an arbitrary monitoring period. Heavy consumption, hangover resistance, and hangover frequency may each be manifestations of low sensitivity to alcohol, an established risk factor for alcohol use disorder.
Authors:
Thomas M Piasecki; Kyle J Alley; Wendy S Slutske; Phillip K Wood; Kenneth J Sher; Saul Shiffman; Andrew C Heath
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of studies on alcohol and drugs     Volume:  73     ISSN:  1938-4114     ISO Abbreviation:  J Stud Alcohol Drugs     Publication Date:  2012 Nov 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-10-05     Completed Date:  2013-01-11     Revised Date:  2014-07-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101295847     Medline TA:  J Stud Alcohol Drugs     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  925-32     Citation Subset:  IM    
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking / adverse effects*,  psychology
Alcohol-Related Disorders / psychology*
Data Collection / methods*
Drinking Behavior*
Drug Resistance*
Ethanol / pharmacology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Self Report
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
K05 AA017242/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS; K05 AA017688/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS; K05AA017242/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS; K05AA017688/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS; P50AA011998/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
3K9958V90M/Ethanol
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Greater elevation in risk for nicotine dependence per pack of cigarettes smoked among those with an ...
Next Document:  Establishment of an immunodeficient alcohol mouse model to study the effects of alcohol on human cel...