Document Detail


Low blood pressure and depressive symptoms among Chinese older subjects: a population-based study.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20362754     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: The relationships between blood pressure and depression are unclear. There are inconsistent reports of an association between low blood pressure and depressive symptoms. METHODS: In a population-based sample of 2611 Chinese older adults aged 55 years and above, including participants with treated (n=1088), untreated (n=545), or no hypertension (n=978), depressive symptoms were determined by the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (> or =5), and current systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure measurements were used to classify participants into high, normal, and low blood pressure groups. Estimates of association were adjusted for confounding by use of antihypertensive and depressogenic drugs and other covariables in hierarchical regression analyses. RESULTS: Systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure were negatively associated with Geriatric Depression Scale scores, independent of other variables. Low systolic blood pressure (odds ratio [OR] 1.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07-2.22), low diastolic blood pressure (OR 1.67; 95% CI, 0.98-2.85), and low systolic blood pressure or diastolic blood pressure (or both) (OR 1.55; 95% CI, 1.10-2.19) were independently associated with depressive symptoms. The associations with depressive symptoms were particularly observed for low systolic blood pressure (OR 2.13; 95% CI, 1.13-4.03) among treated hypertensive participants, and low diastolic blood pressure (OR 2.42; 95% CI, 1.26-4.68) among untreated or nonhypertensive participants. CONCLUSION: Low blood pressure was independently associated with depressive symptoms in both older subjects who were treated for hypertension and those who were not.
Authors:
Tze-Pin Ng; Liang Feng; Mathew Niti; Keng-Bee Yap
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The American journal of medicine     Volume:  123     ISSN:  1555-7162     ISO Abbreviation:  Am. J. Med.     Publication Date:  2010 Apr 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-04-05     Completed Date:  2010-04-22     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0267200     Medline TA:  Am J Med     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  342-9     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Affiliation:
Faculty of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore. pcmngtp@nus.edu.sg
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Aged
Aging
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Blood Pressure / physiology*
Depression / metabolism*
Female
Humans
Hypertension
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Risk Factors

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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