Document Detail


Low birthweight and socioeconomic status, Victoria 1982 to 1986.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  1627704     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between the incidence of low birthweight and socioeconomic status, in particular whether the relationship was different for very low birthweight (less than 1500 g) and moderately low birthweight (1500 to 2499 g). The study population was births from 1982 to 1986 to women resident in Victoria (300,704). Data on socioeconomic status were derived from an indicator developed by the Australian Bureau of Statistics from the 1981 census and applied to postcodes. Using the rates of very low birthweight and moderately low birthweight in the highest socioeconomic status decile as the reference value we found that the relative risk for very low birthweight was significantly raised in only the lowest socioeconomic status decile (relative risk = 1.29, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.17 to 1.42). The relative risk for moderately low birthweight was increased in the two lowest deciles: 1.19 (CI 1.12 to 1.26) and 1.09 (CI 1.01 to 1.17) respectively. Women not married at the time of the birth had a higher rate of low birthweight and were more likely to live in the lower socioeconomic status postcode areas. The relationships between very low birthweight, moderately low birthweight and socioeconomic status were attenuated but still significant when this factor was taken into account. Differences in low birthweight by socioeconomic status decile were not apparent for nonsmoking women. The relationship between smoking and low birthweight was different in the two lowest socioeconomic status deciles: the relative risk of low birthweight in smokers was 2.60 (CI 1.73 to 3.91) compared with a relative risk of 1.64 (CI 1.33 to 2.03) in deciles 3 to 10.
Authors:
R Bell; J Lumley
Related Documents :
15918864 - Learning needs of postpartum women: does socioeconomic status matter?
8888464 - A randomized trial of an empirically-derived social support intervention to prevent low...
24910714 - Fractal correlation property of heart rate variability in response to the postural chan...
21783304 - Sex and ear differences in spontaneous and click-evoked otoacoustic emissions in young ...
16429694 - Benefits of inclusive continence assessments for sexual health.
23706184 - Angiotensin-converting enzyme-inhibitors, statins and the risk of hemorrhage from cereb...
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Australian journal of public health     Volume:  16     ISSN:  1035-7319     ISO Abbreviation:  Aust J Public Health     Publication Date:  1992 Mar 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1992-08-19     Completed Date:  1992-08-19     Revised Date:  2004-11-17    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9105166     Medline TA:  Aust J Public Health     Country:  AUSTRALIA    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  15-9     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Paediatrics, Monash University, Clayton, Vic.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Australia / epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Low Birth Weight*
Infant, Newborn
Marriage
Pregnancy
Risk Factors
Smoking / adverse effects
Socioeconomic Factors
Comments/Corrections
Comment In:
Aust J Public Health. 1992 Jun;16(2):207   [PMID:  1391166 ]

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Medical care for institutionalised elderly people in Singapore.
Next Document:  A family study of coronary risk factors in Geelong.