Document Detail


Long-term plasma lipid changes associated with a first birth: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  15155287     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Previous studies have reported declines in high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol 1-2 years after pregnancy. In 1986-1996, the authors prospectively examined the association between childbearing and changes in fasting plasma lipids (low density lipoprotein, HDL, and total cholesterol; triglycerides) among 1,952 US women (980 Black, 972 White) in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study. Repeated-measures multiple linear regression was used to examine lipid changes over three time intervals (baseline to years 5, 7, and 10) in time-dependent follow-up groups: P0 (0 pregnancies), P1 (>/=1 miscarriages/abortions), B1 (1 birth), and B2 (>/=2 births). Means stratified by race and baseline parity (nulliparous or parous) were fully adjusted for study center, time, height, baseline diet, and other baseline and time-dependent covariates (age, smoking, education, weight, waist circumference, alcohol intake, oral contraceptive use, physical activity, short pregnancies). For both races, fully adjusted HDL cholesterol declines of -3 to -4 mg/dl were associated with a first birth versus no pregnancies during follow-up (p < 0.001). Higher-order births were not associated with greater declines in HDL cholesterol (B2 similar to B1, no association among women parous at baseline). In Whites, total and low density lipoprotein cholesterol declines were associated with follow-up births. HDL cholesterol declines of -3 to -4 mg/dl after a first birth persisted during the 10 years of follow-up independent of weight, central adiposity, and selected behavior changes.
Authors:
Erica P Gunderson; Cora E Lewis; Maureen A Murtaugh; Charles P Quesenberry; Delia Smith West; Stephen Sidney
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.    
Journal Detail:
Title:  American journal of epidemiology     Volume:  159     ISSN:  0002-9262     ISO Abbreviation:  Am. J. Epidemiol.     Publication Date:  2004 Jun 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2004-05-24     Completed Date:  2004-07-22     Revised Date:  2014-07-29    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7910653     Medline TA:  Am J Epidemiol     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1028-39     Citation Subset:  IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
African Continental Ancestry Group / statistics & numerical data
Body Mass Index
Cardiovascular Diseases / etiology
Chi-Square Distribution
European Continental Ancestry Group / statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Lipids / blood*
Longitudinal Studies
Parity
Pregnancy / blood*
Prospective Studies
Risk Factors
Time Factors
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
1 K01 DK59944-01A1/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; K01 DK059944/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; K01 DK059944-02/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; N01 HC048050/HC/NHLBI NIH HHS; N01-HC-48047/HC/NHLBI NIH HHS; N01-HC-48048/HC/NHLBI NIH HHS; N01-HC-48049/HC/NHLBI NIH HHS; N01-HC-48050/HC/NHLBI NIH HHS; N01-HC-95095/HC/NHLBI NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Lipids

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