Document Detail


A LINK BETWEEN OCCUPANT AND VEHICLE ACCELERATIONS DURING COMMON DRIVING TASKS.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  25405424     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
When evaluating occupant motions during driving tasks, it is desirable to have a well-established correlation between vehicle and occupant accelerations. Therefore, this study demonstrated a methodology to quantify accelerations experienced by the driver of a passenger vehicle and compare them to associated vehicle motions. Acceleration levels were measured at the seat and the driver’s head, cervical spine, and lumbar spine during six non-collision driving tasks. Tasks included mounting a 127 mm (5 in) -high curb, crossing railroad tracks, driving on a rough road, braking heavily from 13.4 m/s (30 mph), having a 89 mm (3.5 in)-diameter roller sequentially pass under two tires, and dropping one tire from a 171-mm (6.75 in) height. The driver experienced peak resultant accelerations of similar magnitudes across all trials. Peak body accelerations were less than 1.2 g, including 0.82 g lumbar acceleration during heavy braking and 0.88 g head acceleration during the curb mount. These preliminary measurements are comparable to or lower than accelerations experienced during non-driving activities such as sitting quickly. This study contributes to the scientific understanding of accelerations experienced by vehicle occupants and demonstrates the potential to relate vehicle and occupant accelerations during common driving activities that do not involve collisions.
Authors:
Anne C Mathias; Peggy A Shibata; James K Sprague
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Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Biomedical sciences instrumentation     Volume:  50     ISSN:  0067-8856     ISO Abbreviation:  Biomed Sci Instrum     Publication Date:  2014 Apr 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2014-11-18     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  2014-11-19    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0140524     Medline TA:  Biomed Sci Instrum     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  197-204     Citation Subset:  -    
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