Document Detail


Linguistic background and test material considerations in assessing sentence identification ability in English- and Spanish-English-speaking adolescents.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  931762     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
This study investigated the influence of linguistic background differences on sentence identification by groups of English- and Spanish-English-speaking adolescents. Subjects were required to identify recorded meaningful and nonmeaningful (synthetic) sentences presented in a white noise background using a closed message set-response format. The results indicate that linguistic background variables significantly influence sentence identification ability and that these variables are not adequately controlled for by a closed message set. A significant difference in the ability to identify meaningful and nonmeaningful sentences was revealed. Contrary to previous indications, synthetic sentence identification appeared to be contingent upon key work or phrase recognition.
Authors:
D C Garstecki; M K Wilkin
Publication Detail:
Type:  Comparative Study; Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of the American Audiology Society     Volume:  1     ISSN:  0360-9294     ISO Abbreviation:  J Am Audiol Soc     Publication Date:    1976 May-Jun
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1976-09-01     Completed Date:  1976-09-01     Revised Date:  2006-11-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7602679     Medline TA:  J Am Audiol Soc     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  263-8     Citation Subset:  IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Culture
Educational Measurement*
England
Humans
Language*
Linguistics
Spain

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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