Document Detail


Light at night increases body mass by shifting the time of food intake.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20937863     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The global increase in the prevalence of obesity and metabolic disorders coincides with the increase of exposure to light at night (LAN) and shift work. Circadian regulation of energy homeostasis is controlled by an endogenous biological clock that is synchronized by light information. To promote optimal adaptive functioning, the circadian clock prepares individuals for predictable events such as food availability and sleep, and disruption of clock function causes circadian and metabolic disturbances. To determine whether a causal relationship exists between nighttime light exposure and obesity, we examined the effects of LAN on body mass in male mice. Mice housed in either bright (LL) or dim (DM) LAN have significantly increased body mass and reduced glucose tolerance compared with mice in a standard (LD) light/dark cycle, despite equivalent levels of caloric intake and total daily activity output. Furthermore, the timing of food consumption by DM and LL mice differs from that in LD mice. Nocturnal rodents typically eat substantially more food at night; however, DM mice consume 55.5% of their food during the light phase, as compared with 36.5% in LD mice. Restricting food consumption to the active phase in DM mice prevents body mass gain. These results suggest that low levels of light at night disrupt the timing of food intake and other metabolic signals, leading to excess weight gain. These data are relevant to the coincidence between increasing use of light at night and obesity in humans.
Authors:
Laura K Fonken; Joanna L Workman; James C Walton; Zachary M Weil; John S Morris; Abraham Haim; Randy J Nelson
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.     Date:  2010-10-11
Journal Detail:
Title:  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America     Volume:  107     ISSN:  1091-6490     ISO Abbreviation:  Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.     Publication Date:  2010 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-10-27     Completed Date:  2010-11-22     Revised Date:  2013-07-03    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7505876     Medline TA:  Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  18664-9     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Neuroscience, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. fonken.1@osu.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Body Mass Index
Circadian Rhythm*
Disease Models, Animal
Eating / physiology*,  psychology,  radiation effects*
Energy Intake
Feeding Behavior / physiology,  psychology,  radiation effects
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X / etiology
Mice
Motor Activity
Obesity / etiology*,  pathology,  physiopathology,  psychology
Photoperiod*
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