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Leukocyte β2-Adrenergic Receptor Expression in Response to Resistance Exercise.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21200338     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
INTRODUCTION/PURPOSE:: Epinephrine and norepinephrine mediate interactions between the neuro-endocrine and the immune systems, to alter immune cell activity. While both systems respond to exercise stress, less in known about how they interact in response to such stress. The purpose of this investigation was to examine β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-ADR) expression on circulating leukocytes to an acute bout of resistance exercise in men and women. METHODS:: Resistance trained men (mean ± SD (n=8) age: 24.63 ± 5.07 y; body mass index: 26.09 ± 2.21 kg/m) and women ((n=7) age: 22.13 ± 3.09 y; body mass index: 22.63 ± 2.03 kg/m) performed an acute resistance exercise protocol (6 sets of 5 RM heavy squats) and a control test (i.e., identical conditions with no exercise) in a balanced, randomized order. Using a within subject design, β2-ADR expression on circulating leukocytes were evaluated with flow cytometry and plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine were evaluated with high performance liquid chromatography. RESULTS:: Plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine increased during the exercise bout and returned to baseline during recovery. β2-ADR expression on monocytes was elevated in anticipation of the exercise protocol. β2-ADR expression on monocytes and granulocytes decreased during the exercise. β2-ADR expression on lymphocytes was elevated during the recovery time points. CONCLUSION:: In conclusion, β2-ADR expression on leukocyte subpopulations changes in response to acute heavy resistance exercise protocol. Present findings provide insights into the potential temporal interactions between the neuro-endocrine and the immune systems in response to the physiological stress of acute heavy resistance exercise in men and women.
Authors:
Maren S Fragala; William J Kraemer; Andrea M Mastro; Craig R Denegar; Jeff S Volek; Keijo Häkkinen; Jeffrey M Anderson; Elaine Lee; Carl M Maresh
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Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2010-12-21
Journal Detail:
Title:  Medicine and science in sports and exercise     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1530-0315     ISO Abbreviation:  -     Publication Date:  2010 Dec 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-1-4     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8005433     Medline TA:  Med Sci Sports Exerc     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
1Human Performance Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269; 2Department of Physiology and Neurobiology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269; 3Center for Aging, Division of Geriatric Medicine, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT 06030; 4Department of Microbiology and Cell Biology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 16802; 5Department of Biology of Physical Activity & Neuromuscular Research Center, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
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