Document Detail


Leptin withdrawal after birth: A neglected factor account for cognitive deficit in offspring of GDM mother.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21498005     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Pregnancy in the diabetic woman has long been associated with an increased risk of cognitive deficit in the offspring, which might be associated with the poor intrauterine environment for the developing fetal brain. Leptin, as an important hormone regulating the intrauterine and early extrauterine life growth and development, greatly elevated during diabetic pregnancy. The current results indicate that leptin exerts neurotrophic actions during the critical period of development of hippocampus, and acts as a cognitive enhancer. Leptin resistance was a common phenomenon in diabetic pregnancies resulting reduced leptin receptors and signaling. With sudden withdrawal of placenta-derived leptin after birth, neonatal leptin levels declined sharply. The declined leptin could not work normally with the reduced leptin receptor and thus affected the newborn's brain development, which at least partly accounted for later cognitive deficits of offspring of GDM mother. Our hypothesis provides an alternative strategy to decrease the risk of cognitive deficit of offspring of diabetic mother, by exogenously supplementing leptin after birth for some period.
Authors:
Zhengqiong Chen; Yandong Zhao; Ying Yang; Zhen Li
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Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2011-4-15
Journal Detail:
Title:  Medical hypotheses     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1532-2777     ISO Abbreviation:  -     Publication Date:  2011 Apr 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-4-18     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7505668     Medline TA:  Med Hypotheses     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400030, PR China.
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