Document Detail


Leptin concentrations in response to acute stress predict subsequent intake of comfort foods.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22579988     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Both animals and humans show a tendency toward eating more "comfort food" (high fat, sweet food) after acute stress. Such stress eating may be contributing to the obesity epidemic, and it is important to understand the underlying psychobiological mechanisms. Prior investigations have studied what makes individuals eat more after stress; this study investigates what might make individuals eat less. Leptin has been shown to increase following a laboratory stressor, and is known to regulate satiety. This study examined whether leptin reactivity accounts for individual differences in stress eating. To test this, we exposed forty women to standardized acute psychological laboratory stress (Trier Social Stress Test) while blood was sampled repeatedly for measurements of plasma leptin. We then measured food intake after the stressor. Increasing leptin during the stressor predicted lower intake of comfort food. These initial findings suggest that acute changes in leptin may be one of the factors modulating down the consumption of comfort food following stress.
Authors:
A Janet Tomiyama; Imke Schamarek; Robert H Lustig; Clemens Kirschbaum; Eli Puterman; Peter J Havel; Elissa S Epel
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't     Date:  2012-05-02
Journal Detail:
Title:  Physiology & behavior     Volume:  107     ISSN:  1873-507X     ISO Abbreviation:  Physiol. Behav.     Publication Date:  2012 Aug 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-07-31     Completed Date:  2013-01-07     Revised Date:  2013-08-27    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0151504     Medline TA:  Physiol Behav     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  34-9     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA. tomiyama@psych.ucla.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body Mass Index
Eating / physiology*,  psychology*
Energy Intake / physiology
Female
Food*
Humans
Leptin / blood*
Middle Aged
Psychological Tests
Stress, Psychological / blood*
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
K08 MH064110/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; K08 MH64110-01A1/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; R56 AG030424/AG/NIA NIH HHS; UL1 RR024131/RR/NCRR NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Leptin
Comments/Corrections

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